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Environmental forcing and genetic differentiation in subdivided populations

Ranta, Esa; Kaitala, Veijo; Bjorklund, Mats; Lundberg, Per LU ; Bach, Lars LU and Stenseth, Nils Chr (2008) In Evolutionary Ecology Research 10(1). p.1-9
Abstract
Questions: How will genetic differentiation and genetic drift in spatially structured populations be affected by different classes of autocorrelated environmental noise? How does dispersal interact with fluctuations generated from the demographic and environmental forcing in shaping the neutral genetic patterns? Model and key assumptions: Populations are regulated locally by density-dependent feedback including demographic stochasticity but they are also here forced by environmental noise (white, red, and blue noise corresponding to random, positive, and negative autocorrelation respectively). Spatial structure consists of a looped string of populations connected by dispersal and each with a predefined carrying capacity (one-dimensional... (More)
Questions: How will genetic differentiation and genetic drift in spatially structured populations be affected by different classes of autocorrelated environmental noise? How does dispersal interact with fluctuations generated from the demographic and environmental forcing in shaping the neutral genetic patterns? Model and key assumptions: Populations are regulated locally by density-dependent feedback including demographic stochasticity but they are also here forced by environmental noise (white, red, and blue noise corresponding to random, positive, and negative autocorrelation respectively). Spatial structure consists of a looped string of populations connected by dispersal and each with a predefined carrying capacity (one-dimensional stepping stone structure). Method: Simulations initialized by randomly distributing individuals, and thus genotypes, in space (no fitness differences, no mutation, no recombination, no selection). Conclusions: In an unpredictable way, red noise reinforces the genetic differentiation among populations more than white or blue noise. Dispersal appears unable to dilute the differentiation effect of positively autocorrelated forcing. In modelling the effect of environmental stochasticity, details about the type of environmental noise are of paramount importance for the results and their biological and management implications. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
population dynamics., genetic differentiation, environmental noise, climate change, drift
in
Evolutionary Ecology Research
volume
10
issue
1
pages
1 - 9
publisher
Evolutionary Ecology Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000253464000001
  • scopus:39749133591
ISSN
1522-0613
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7618c8c2-b16a-47ae-a8f3-1678c529c1a8 (old id 1193832)
date added to LUP
2008-09-10 09:29:23
date last changed
2017-05-28 04:06:56
@article{7618c8c2-b16a-47ae-a8f3-1678c529c1a8,
  abstract     = {Questions: How will genetic differentiation and genetic drift in spatially structured populations be affected by different classes of autocorrelated environmental noise? How does dispersal interact with fluctuations generated from the demographic and environmental forcing in shaping the neutral genetic patterns? Model and key assumptions: Populations are regulated locally by density-dependent feedback including demographic stochasticity but they are also here forced by environmental noise (white, red, and blue noise corresponding to random, positive, and negative autocorrelation respectively). Spatial structure consists of a looped string of populations connected by dispersal and each with a predefined carrying capacity (one-dimensional stepping stone structure). Method: Simulations initialized by randomly distributing individuals, and thus genotypes, in space (no fitness differences, no mutation, no recombination, no selection). Conclusions: In an unpredictable way, red noise reinforces the genetic differentiation among populations more than white or blue noise. Dispersal appears unable to dilute the differentiation effect of positively autocorrelated forcing. In modelling the effect of environmental stochasticity, details about the type of environmental noise are of paramount importance for the results and their biological and management implications.},
  author       = {Ranta, Esa and Kaitala, Veijo and Bjorklund, Mats and Lundberg, Per and Bach, Lars and Stenseth, Nils Chr},
  issn         = {1522-0613},
  keyword      = {population dynamics.,genetic differentiation,environmental noise,climate change,drift},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--9},
  publisher    = {Evolutionary Ecology Ltd},
  series       = {Evolutionary Ecology Research},
  title        = {Environmental forcing and genetic differentiation in subdivided populations},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2008},
}