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Assessing educational priorities in genetics for general practitioners and specialists in five countries: factor structure of the Genetic-Educational Priorities (Gen-EP) scale

Calefato, Jean-Marc; Nippert, Irma; Harris, Hilary J.; Kristoffersson, Ulf LU ; Schmidtke, Jorg; Ten Kate, Leo P.; Anionwu, Elizabeth; Benjamin, Caroline; Challen, Kirsty and Plass, Anne-Marie, et al. (2008) In Genetics in Medicine 10(2). p.99-106
Abstract
Purpose: A scale assessing primary care physicians' priorities for genetic education (The Gen-EP scale) was developed and tested in five European countries. The objective of this study was to determine its factor structure, to test scaling assumptions and to determine internal consistency. Methods: The sample consisted of 3686 practitioners (general practitioners, gyneco-obstetricians, pediatricians) sampled in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and United Kingdom. We first determined the factor structure of the Gen-EP scale (30 items) on the whole sample. Scaling assumptions were then tested on each country using multitrait scaling analysis. Internal consistency was assessed across the five countries. Results: Six factors were... (More)
Purpose: A scale assessing primary care physicians' priorities for genetic education (The Gen-EP scale) was developed and tested in five European countries. The objective of this study was to determine its factor structure, to test scaling assumptions and to determine internal consistency. Methods: The sample consisted of 3686 practitioners (general practitioners, gyneco-obstetricians, pediatricians) sampled in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and United Kingdom. We first determined the factor structure of the Gen-EP scale (30 items) on the whole sample. Scaling assumptions were then tested on each country using multitrait scaling analysis. Internal consistency was assessed across the five countries. Results: Six factors were identified accounting for 63.3% of the variance of the items. They represented the following priorities for genetic education: "Genetics of Common Diseases"; "Ethical, Legal, and Public Health Issues"; "Approaching Genetic Risk Assessment in Clinical Practice"; "Basic Genetics and Congenital Malformations"; "Techniques and Innovation in Genetics" and "Psychosocial and Counseling Issues." In each country, convergent and discriminant validity were satisfactory. Internal-consistency reliability coefficients (Cronbach's alpha) were all above the acceptable threshold (0.70). Conclusion: The Gen-EP scale could be a helpful instrument in different countries to organize and evaluate the impact of genetic educational programs for primary care providers. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
continuing education, factor analysis, reliability, genetics
in
Genetics in Medicine
volume
10
issue
2
pages
99 - 106
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000253277400004
  • scopus:39449090209
ISSN
1098-3600
DOI
10.1097/GIM.Ob013e3181614271
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3d6cdc72-180a-4677-a188-ec6e91243c76 (old id 1196537)
date added to LUP
2008-09-10 11:55:55
date last changed
2017-05-21 03:43:00
@article{3d6cdc72-180a-4677-a188-ec6e91243c76,
  abstract     = {Purpose: A scale assessing primary care physicians' priorities for genetic education (The Gen-EP scale) was developed and tested in five European countries. The objective of this study was to determine its factor structure, to test scaling assumptions and to determine internal consistency. Methods: The sample consisted of 3686 practitioners (general practitioners, gyneco-obstetricians, pediatricians) sampled in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and United Kingdom. We first determined the factor structure of the Gen-EP scale (30 items) on the whole sample. Scaling assumptions were then tested on each country using multitrait scaling analysis. Internal consistency was assessed across the five countries. Results: Six factors were identified accounting for 63.3% of the variance of the items. They represented the following priorities for genetic education: "Genetics of Common Diseases"; "Ethical, Legal, and Public Health Issues"; "Approaching Genetic Risk Assessment in Clinical Practice"; "Basic Genetics and Congenital Malformations"; "Techniques and Innovation in Genetics" and "Psychosocial and Counseling Issues." In each country, convergent and discriminant validity were satisfactory. Internal-consistency reliability coefficients (Cronbach's alpha) were all above the acceptable threshold (0.70). Conclusion: The Gen-EP scale could be a helpful instrument in different countries to organize and evaluate the impact of genetic educational programs for primary care providers.},
  author       = {Calefato, Jean-Marc and Nippert, Irma and Harris, Hilary J. and Kristoffersson, Ulf and Schmidtke, Jorg and Ten Kate, Leo P. and Anionwu, Elizabeth and Benjamin, Caroline and Challen, Kirsty and Plass, Anne-Marie and Harris, Rodney and Julian-Reynier, Claire},
  issn         = {1098-3600},
  keyword      = {continuing education,factor analysis,reliability,genetics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {99--106},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Genetics in Medicine},
  title        = {Assessing educational priorities in genetics for general practitioners and specialists in five countries: factor structure of the Genetic-Educational Priorities (Gen-EP) scale},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GIM.Ob013e3181614271},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2008},
}