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Sensitivity of an ecosystem model to hydrology and temperature

Wolf, Annett LU ; Blyth, Eleanor; Harding, Richard; Jacob, Daniela; Keup-Thiel, Elke; Goettel, Holger and Callaghan, Terry (2008) In Climatic Change 87(1-2). p.75-89
Abstract
We tested the sensitivity of a dynamic ecosystem model (LPJ-GUESS) to the representation of soil moisture and soil temperature and to uncertainties in the prediction of precipitation and air temperature. We linked the ecosystem model with an advanced hydrological model (JULES) and used its soil moisture and soil temperature as input into the ecosystem model. We analysed these sensitivities along a latitudinal gradient in northern Russia. Differences in soil temperature and soil moisture had only little influence on the vegetation carbon fluxes, whereas the soil carbon fluxes were very sensitive to the JULES soil estimations. The sensitivity changed with latitude, showing stronger influence in the more northern grid cell. The sensitivity of... (More)
We tested the sensitivity of a dynamic ecosystem model (LPJ-GUESS) to the representation of soil moisture and soil temperature and to uncertainties in the prediction of precipitation and air temperature. We linked the ecosystem model with an advanced hydrological model (JULES) and used its soil moisture and soil temperature as input into the ecosystem model. We analysed these sensitivities along a latitudinal gradient in northern Russia. Differences in soil temperature and soil moisture had only little influence on the vegetation carbon fluxes, whereas the soil carbon fluxes were very sensitive to the JULES soil estimations. The sensitivity changed with latitude, showing stronger influence in the more northern grid cell. The sensitivity of modelled responses of both soil carbon fluxes and vegetation carbon fluxes to uncertainties in soil temperature were high, as both soil and vegetation carbon fluxes were strongly impacted. In contrast, uncertainties in the estimation of the amount of precipitation had little influence on the soil or vegetation carbon fluxes. The high sensitivity of soil respiration to soil temperature and moisture suggests that we should strive for a better understanding and representation of soil processes in ecosystem models to improve the reliability of predictions of future ecosystem changes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Climatic Change
volume
87
issue
1-2
pages
75 - 89
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000253347000005
  • scopus:39649090543
ISSN
0165-0009
DOI
10.1007/s10584-007-9339-z
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f3d66e8f-7f13-471a-9061-d07c6440bbf1 (old id 1196942)
date added to LUP
2008-09-10 12:45:21
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:41:04
@article{f3d66e8f-7f13-471a-9061-d07c6440bbf1,
  abstract     = {We tested the sensitivity of a dynamic ecosystem model (LPJ-GUESS) to the representation of soil moisture and soil temperature and to uncertainties in the prediction of precipitation and air temperature. We linked the ecosystem model with an advanced hydrological model (JULES) and used its soil moisture and soil temperature as input into the ecosystem model. We analysed these sensitivities along a latitudinal gradient in northern Russia. Differences in soil temperature and soil moisture had only little influence on the vegetation carbon fluxes, whereas the soil carbon fluxes were very sensitive to the JULES soil estimations. The sensitivity changed with latitude, showing stronger influence in the more northern grid cell. The sensitivity of modelled responses of both soil carbon fluxes and vegetation carbon fluxes to uncertainties in soil temperature were high, as both soil and vegetation carbon fluxes were strongly impacted. In contrast, uncertainties in the estimation of the amount of precipitation had little influence on the soil or vegetation carbon fluxes. The high sensitivity of soil respiration to soil temperature and moisture suggests that we should strive for a better understanding and representation of soil processes in ecosystem models to improve the reliability of predictions of future ecosystem changes.},
  author       = {Wolf, Annett and Blyth, Eleanor and Harding, Richard and Jacob, Daniela and Keup-Thiel, Elke and Goettel, Holger and Callaghan, Terry},
  issn         = {0165-0009},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {75--89},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Climatic Change},
  title        = {Sensitivity of an ecosystem model to hydrology and temperature},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10584-007-9339-z},
  volume       = {87},
  year         = {2008},
}