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Factors Contributing to Perceived Walking Difficulties in People with Parkinson’s Disease

Kader, Manzur LU ; Ullén, Susann; Iwarsson, Susanne LU ; Odin, Per LU and Nilsson, Maria H LU (2017) In Journal of Parkinson's Disease 7(2). p.397-407
Abstract
Background: While walking difficulties are common in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), little is known about factors that independently contribute to their perceived walking difficulties.
Objective: To identify factors that independently contribute to perceived walking difficulties in people with PD.
Methods: This study involved 243 (62% men) participants; their mean (min-max) age and PD duration were 70 (45-93) and 8 (1-43) years, respectively. A postal survey preceded a home visit that included observations, clinical tests, questions and questionnaires that were administered as a structured interview. Perceived walking difficulties (dependent variable) were assessed with the self-administered generic Walk-12 (Walk-12G,... (More)
Background: While walking difficulties are common in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), little is known about factors that independently contribute to their perceived walking difficulties.
Objective: To identify factors that independently contribute to perceived walking difficulties in people with PD.
Methods: This study involved 243 (62% men) participants; their mean (min-max) age and PD duration were 70 (45-93) and 8 (1-43) years, respectively. A postal survey preceded a home visit that included observations, clinical tests, questions and questionnaires that were administered as a structured interview. Perceived walking difficulties (dependent variable) were assessed with the self-administered generic Walk-12 (Walk-12G, scored 0-42, higher=worse). Independent variables included personal (e.g., age and general self-efficacy) and social environmental factors (e.g., social support and living situation) as well as disease-related factors including motor (e.g., freezing of gait (FOG) and postural instability) and non-motor symptoms (e.g., fatigue and orthostatic hypotension). Linear multiple regression analysis was used to identify factors that independently contributed to perceived walking difficulties.
Results: Eight significant independent variables explained 56.3% of the variance in perceived walking difficulties. FOG was the strongest significant contributing factor to perceived walking difficulties, followed by general self-efficacy, fatigue, PD duration, lower extremity function, orthostatic hypotension, bradykinesia and postural instability.
Conclusion: Motor and non-motor symptoms as well as personal factors (i.e., general self-efficacy) seem to be of importance for perceived walking difficulties in PD. These findings might nurture future interventions that address modifiable factors in order to enhance walking ability in people with PD.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Parkinson's Disease
volume
7
issue
2
pages
11 pages
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85019383832
  • wos:000401801600020
ISSN
1877-718X
DOI
10.3233/JPD-161034
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1200156c-8ef1-42a2-9cda-3437eb86cd83
date added to LUP
2017-05-30 09:22:51
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:38:01
@article{1200156c-8ef1-42a2-9cda-3437eb86cd83,
  abstract     = {Background: While walking difficulties are common in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), little is known about factors that independently contribute to their perceived walking difficulties. <br/>Objective: To identify factors that independently contribute to perceived walking difficulties in people with PD.<br/>Methods: This study involved 243 (62% men) participants; their mean (min-max) age and PD duration were 70 (45-93) and 8 (1-43) years, respectively. A postal survey preceded a home visit that included observations, clinical tests, questions and questionnaires that were administered as a structured interview. Perceived walking difficulties (dependent variable) were assessed with the self-administered generic Walk-12 (Walk-12G, scored 0-42, higher=worse). Independent variables included personal (e.g., age and general self-efficacy) and social environmental factors (e.g., social support and living situation) as well as disease-related factors including motor (e.g., freezing of gait (FOG) and postural instability) and non-motor symptoms (e.g., fatigue and orthostatic hypotension). Linear multiple regression analysis was used to identify factors that independently contributed to perceived walking difficulties.<br/>Results: Eight significant independent variables explained 56.3% of the variance in perceived walking difficulties. FOG was the strongest significant contributing factor to perceived walking difficulties, followed by general self-efficacy, fatigue, PD duration, lower extremity function, orthostatic hypotension, bradykinesia and postural instability.<br/>Conclusion: Motor and non-motor symptoms as well as personal factors (i.e., general self-efficacy) seem to be of importance for perceived walking difficulties in PD. These findings might nurture future interventions that address modifiable factors in order to enhance walking ability in people with PD. <br/>},
  author       = {Kader, Manzur and Ullén, Susann and Iwarsson, Susanne and Odin, Per and Nilsson, Maria H},
  issn         = {1877-718X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {397--407},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Journal of Parkinson's Disease},
  title        = {Factors Contributing to Perceived Walking Difficulties in People with Parkinson’s Disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JPD-161034},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2017},
}