Advanced

Risk of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Smokers Is Related to Plasma Levels of Inflammation-Sensitive Proteins.

Lind, P.; Engström, Gunnar LU ; Stavenow, L.; Janzon, Lars LU ; Lindgärde, Folke LU and Hedblad, Bo LU (2004) In Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 24(3). p.577-582
Abstract
Background— The extent to which differences in cardiovascular risk between smokers with similar daily tobacco consumption may be related to plasma levels of inflammation-sensitive proteins (ISP) and whether these proteins are associated with levels of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb%) have not been clarified.



Methods and Results— In a population-based cohort of 1489 never smokers, 1685 former smokers, and 2901 current smokers, aged 28 to 61 years, plasma levels of orosomucoid ({alpha}1-acid glycoprotein), {alpha}1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, and ceruloplasmin were measured. COHb% levels were available for 2098 of them. Incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death were monitored over 18.7±4.7 years. The... (More)
Background— The extent to which differences in cardiovascular risk between smokers with similar daily tobacco consumption may be related to plasma levels of inflammation-sensitive proteins (ISP) and whether these proteins are associated with levels of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb%) have not been clarified.



Methods and Results— In a population-based cohort of 1489 never smokers, 1685 former smokers, and 2901 current smokers, aged 28 to 61 years, plasma levels of orosomucoid ({alpha}1-acid glycoprotein), {alpha}1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, and ceruloplasmin were measured. COHb% levels were available for 2098 of them. Incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death were monitored over 18.7±4.7 years. The proportion with high ISP levels (ie, >=2 ISP in the top quartile) increased progressively with daily tobacco consumption (P<0.01) and COHb% (P<0.01). In all smoking categories, the incidence of stroke, cardiac events, and death was related to ISP. In heavy smokers, high ISP levels were associated with adjusted relative risks of 1.57 (1.05 to 2.35) and 1.50 (1.11 to 2.03) for cardiac events and death, respectively. Corresponding figures for moderate and light smokers were 1.59 (1.13 to 2.24) and 1.14 (0.87 to 1.49), respectively, and 1.32 (0.95 to 1.85) and 1.48 (1.10 to 1.98), respectively.



Conclusion— ISP levels are related to COHb% in smokers. High levels are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology
volume
24
issue
3
pages
577 - 582
publisher
American Heart Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:14726408
  • wos:000220052800031
  • scopus:1542283771
ISSN
1524-4636
DOI
10.1161/01.ATV.0000116863.37311.82
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
adc8b173-8290-4fe1-95e9-3dbfeae73d48 (old id 120118)
date added to LUP
2007-07-25 14:12:58
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:46:05
@article{adc8b173-8290-4fe1-95e9-3dbfeae73d48,
  abstract     = {Background— The extent to which differences in cardiovascular risk between smokers with similar daily tobacco consumption may be related to plasma levels of inflammation-sensitive proteins (ISP) and whether these proteins are associated with levels of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb%) have not been clarified.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods and Results— In a population-based cohort of 1489 never smokers, 1685 former smokers, and 2901 current smokers, aged 28 to 61 years, plasma levels of orosomucoid ({alpha}1-acid glycoprotein), {alpha}1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, and ceruloplasmin were measured. COHb% levels were available for 2098 of them. Incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death were monitored over 18.7±4.7 years. The proportion with high ISP levels (ie, &gt;=2 ISP in the top quartile) increased progressively with daily tobacco consumption (P&lt;0.01) and COHb% (P&lt;0.01). In all smoking categories, the incidence of stroke, cardiac events, and death was related to ISP. In heavy smokers, high ISP levels were associated with adjusted relative risks of 1.57 (1.05 to 2.35) and 1.50 (1.11 to 2.03) for cardiac events and death, respectively. Corresponding figures for moderate and light smokers were 1.59 (1.13 to 2.24) and 1.14 (0.87 to 1.49), respectively, and 1.32 (0.95 to 1.85) and 1.48 (1.10 to 1.98), respectively.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion— ISP levels are related to COHb% in smokers. High levels are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk.},
  author       = {Lind, P. and Engström, Gunnar and Stavenow, L. and Janzon, Lars and Lindgärde, Folke and Hedblad, Bo},
  issn         = {1524-4636},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {577--582},
  publisher    = {American Heart Association},
  series       = {Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology},
  title        = {Risk of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in Smokers Is Related to Plasma Levels of Inflammation-Sensitive Proteins.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.ATV.0000116863.37311.82},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2004},
}