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Repetitive ultrafast melting of InSb as an x-ray timing diagnostic

Allaf Navirian, Hengameh LU ; Enquist, Henrik LU ; Hansen, Tue LU ; Mikkelsen, Anders LU ; Sondhauss, Peter LU ; Srivastava, Alok LU ; Zakharov, Alexei LU and Larsson, Jörgen LU (2008) In Applied Physics Reviews 103(10). p.6-103510
Abstract
We have demonstrated the possibility of using repetitive ultrafast melting of InSb as a timing diagnostic in connection with visible-light pump/x-ray probe measurements at high-repetition-rate x-ray facilities. Although the sample was molten and regrown approximately 1x10(6) times, a distinct reduction in time-resolved x-ray reflectivity could be observed using a streak camera with a time resolution of 2.5 ps. The time-resolved x-ray reflectivity displayed this distinct decrease despite the fact that the average reflectivity of the sample had fallen to approximately 50% of its original value due to accumulated damage from the prolonged laser exposure. The topography of the laser-exposed sample was mapped using an optical microscope, a... (More)
We have demonstrated the possibility of using repetitive ultrafast melting of InSb as a timing diagnostic in connection with visible-light pump/x-ray probe measurements at high-repetition-rate x-ray facilities. Although the sample was molten and regrown approximately 1x10(6) times, a distinct reduction in time-resolved x-ray reflectivity could be observed using a streak camera with a time resolution of 2.5 ps. The time-resolved x-ray reflectivity displayed this distinct decrease despite the fact that the average reflectivity of the sample had fallen to approximately 50% of its original value due to accumulated damage from the prolonged laser exposure. The topography of the laser-exposed sample was mapped using an optical microscope, a stylus profilometer, photoelectron microscopy, and a scanning tunneling microscope. Although the surface of the sample is not flat following prolonged exposure at laser fluences above 15 mJ/cm(2), the atomic scale structure regrows, and thus, regenerates the sample on a nanosecond timescale. In the fluence range between 15 and 25 mJ/cm(2), the laser power is sufficient to melt the sample, while regrowth occurs with a sufficiently good structure to allow the extraction of timing information via ultrafast time-resolved x-ray measurements. This can be applied for timing purposes at synchrotron radiation and x-ray free-electron laser facilities. It is also noteworthy that we were able to reproduce the fluence dependencies of melting depth and disordering time previously obtained in single-shot, nonthermal melting experiments with higher temporal resolution. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Applied Physics Reviews
volume
103
issue
10
pages
6 - 103510
publisher
American Institute of Physics
external identifiers
  • wos:000256303800031
  • scopus:44649178208
ISSN
0021-8979
DOI
10.1063/1.2932155
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
82ee2690-8531-450c-8948-bf4d8920892c (old id 1201224)
date added to LUP
2008-09-15 09:38:36
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:04:49
@article{82ee2690-8531-450c-8948-bf4d8920892c,
  abstract     = {We have demonstrated the possibility of using repetitive ultrafast melting of InSb as a timing diagnostic in connection with visible-light pump/x-ray probe measurements at high-repetition-rate x-ray facilities. Although the sample was molten and regrown approximately 1x10(6) times, a distinct reduction in time-resolved x-ray reflectivity could be observed using a streak camera with a time resolution of 2.5 ps. The time-resolved x-ray reflectivity displayed this distinct decrease despite the fact that the average reflectivity of the sample had fallen to approximately 50% of its original value due to accumulated damage from the prolonged laser exposure. The topography of the laser-exposed sample was mapped using an optical microscope, a stylus profilometer, photoelectron microscopy, and a scanning tunneling microscope. Although the surface of the sample is not flat following prolonged exposure at laser fluences above 15 mJ/cm(2), the atomic scale structure regrows, and thus, regenerates the sample on a nanosecond timescale. In the fluence range between 15 and 25 mJ/cm(2), the laser power is sufficient to melt the sample, while regrowth occurs with a sufficiently good structure to allow the extraction of timing information via ultrafast time-resolved x-ray measurements. This can be applied for timing purposes at synchrotron radiation and x-ray free-electron laser facilities. It is also noteworthy that we were able to reproduce the fluence dependencies of melting depth and disordering time previously obtained in single-shot, nonthermal melting experiments with higher temporal resolution.},
  author       = {Allaf Navirian, Hengameh and Enquist, Henrik and Hansen, Tue and Mikkelsen, Anders and Sondhauss, Peter and Srivastava, Alok and Zakharov, Alexei and Larsson, Jörgen},
  issn         = {0021-8979},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {6--103510},
  publisher    = {American Institute of Physics},
  series       = {Applied Physics Reviews},
  title        = {Repetitive ultrafast melting of InSb as an x-ray timing diagnostic},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.2932155},
  volume       = {103},
  year         = {2008},
}