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Myeloma in patients younger than age 50 years presents with more favorable features and shows better survival: an analysis of 10 549 patients from the International Myeloma Working Group

Ludwig, Heinz; Durie, Brian G M; Bolejack, Vanessa; Turesson, Ingemar LU ; Kyle, Robert A; Blade, Joan; Fonseca, Rafael; Dimopouios, Meletios; Shimizu, Kazuyuki and Miguel, Jesus San, et al. (2008) In Blood 111(8). p.4039-4047
Abstract
We analyzed the presenting features and survival in 1689 patients with multiple myeloma aged younger than 50 years compared with 8860 patients 50 years of age and older. Of the total 10 549 patients, 7765 received conventional therapy and 2784 received high-dose therapy. Young patients were more frequently male, had more favorable features such as low International Staging System (ISS) and Durle-Salmon stage as well as less frequently adverse prognostic factors including high C-reactive protein (CRIP), low hemoglobin, increased serum creartinine, and poor performance status. Survival was significantly longer in young patients (median, 5.2 years vs 3.7 years; P <.001) both after conventional (median, 4.5 years vs 3.3 years; P <.001)... (More)
We analyzed the presenting features and survival in 1689 patients with multiple myeloma aged younger than 50 years compared with 8860 patients 50 years of age and older. Of the total 10 549 patients, 7765 received conventional therapy and 2784 received high-dose therapy. Young patients were more frequently male, had more favorable features such as low International Staging System (ISS) and Durle-Salmon stage as well as less frequently adverse prognostic factors including high C-reactive protein (CRIP), low hemoglobin, increased serum creartinine, and poor performance status. Survival was significantly longer in young patients (median, 5.2 years vs 3.7 years; P <.001) both after conventional (median, 4.5 years vs 3.3 years; P <.001) or high-dose therapy (median, 7.5 years vs 5.7 years; P =.04). The 10-year survival rate was 19% after conventional therapy and 43% after highdose therapy in young patients, and 8% and 29%, respectively, in older patients. Multivariate analysis revealed age as an independent risk factor during conventional therapy, but not after autologous transplantation. A total of 5 of the 10 independent risk factors identified for conventional therapy were also relevant for autologous transplantation. After adjusting for normal mortality, lower ISS stage and other favorable prognostic features seem to account for the significantly longer survival of young patients with multiple myeloma with age remaining a risk factor during conventional therapy. (Less)
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Blood
volume
111
issue
8
pages
4039 - 4047
publisher
American Society of Hematology
external identifiers
  • wos:000255134700025
  • scopus:43249125513
ISSN
1528-0020
DOI
10.1182/blood-2007-03-081018
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e97b4093-16b2-4d5b-b438-9ea5faf22b42 (old id 1205552)
date added to LUP
2008-09-19 11:24:41
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:28:03
@article{e97b4093-16b2-4d5b-b438-9ea5faf22b42,
  abstract     = {We analyzed the presenting features and survival in 1689 patients with multiple myeloma aged younger than 50 years compared with 8860 patients 50 years of age and older. Of the total 10 549 patients, 7765 received conventional therapy and 2784 received high-dose therapy. Young patients were more frequently male, had more favorable features such as low International Staging System (ISS) and Durle-Salmon stage as well as less frequently adverse prognostic factors including high C-reactive protein (CRIP), low hemoglobin, increased serum creartinine, and poor performance status. Survival was significantly longer in young patients (median, 5.2 years vs 3.7 years; P &lt;.001) both after conventional (median, 4.5 years vs 3.3 years; P &lt;.001) or high-dose therapy (median, 7.5 years vs 5.7 years; P =.04). The 10-year survival rate was 19% after conventional therapy and 43% after highdose therapy in young patients, and 8% and 29%, respectively, in older patients. Multivariate analysis revealed age as an independent risk factor during conventional therapy, but not after autologous transplantation. A total of 5 of the 10 independent risk factors identified for conventional therapy were also relevant for autologous transplantation. After adjusting for normal mortality, lower ISS stage and other favorable prognostic features seem to account for the significantly longer survival of young patients with multiple myeloma with age remaining a risk factor during conventional therapy.},
  author       = {Ludwig, Heinz and Durie, Brian G M and Bolejack, Vanessa and Turesson, Ingemar and Kyle, Robert A and Blade, Joan and Fonseca, Rafael and Dimopouios, Meletios and Shimizu, Kazuyuki and Miguel, Jesus San and Westin, Jan and Harousseau, Jean-Luc and Beksac, Meral and Boccadoro, Mario and Palumbo, Antonio and Barlogie, Bart and Shustik, Chaim and Cavo, Michele and Greipp, Philip R and Joshua, Douglas and Attal, Michel and Sonneveld, Pieter and Crowley, John},
  issn         = {1528-0020},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {4039--4047},
  publisher    = {American Society of Hematology},
  series       = {Blood},
  title        = {Myeloma in patients younger than age 50 years presents with more favorable features and shows better survival: an analysis of 10 549 patients from the International Myeloma Working Group},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2007-03-081018},
  volume       = {111},
  year         = {2008},
}