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The fat-like gene of drosophila is the true orthologue of vertebrate fat cadherins and is involved in the formation of tubular organs.

Castillejo-Lopez, Casimiro LU ; Martinez Arias, Wilma LU and Baumgartner, Stefan LU (2004) In Journal of Biological Chemistry 279(23). p.24034-24043
Abstract
Fat cadherins constitute a subclass of the large cadherin family characterized by the presence of 34 cadherin motifs. To date, three mammalian Fat cadherins have been described; however, only limited information is known about the function of these molecules. In this paper, we describe the second fat cadherin in Drosophila, fat-like (ftl). We show that ftl is the true orthologue of vertebrate fat-like genes, whereas the previously characterized tumor suppressor cadherin, fat, is more distantly related as compared with ftl. Ftl is a large molecule of 4705 amino acids. It is expressed apically in luminal tissues such as trachea, salivary glands, proventriculus, and hindgut. Silencing of ftl results in the collapse of tracheal epithelia... (More)
Fat cadherins constitute a subclass of the large cadherin family characterized by the presence of 34 cadherin motifs. To date, three mammalian Fat cadherins have been described; however, only limited information is known about the function of these molecules. In this paper, we describe the second fat cadherin in Drosophila, fat-like (ftl). We show that ftl is the true orthologue of vertebrate fat-like genes, whereas the previously characterized tumor suppressor cadherin, fat, is more distantly related as compared with ftl. Ftl is a large molecule of 4705 amino acids. It is expressed apically in luminal tissues such as trachea, salivary glands, proventriculus, and hindgut. Silencing of ftl results in the collapse of tracheal epithelia giving rise to breaks, deletions, and sac-like structures. Other tubular organs such as proventriculus, salivary glands, and hindgut are also malformed or missing. These data suggest that Ftl is required for morphogenesis and maintenance of tubular structures of ectodermal origin and underline its similarity in function to a reported lethal mouse knock-out of fat1 where glomerular epithelial processes collapse. Based on our results, we propose a model where Ftl acts as a spacer to keep tubular epithelia apart rather than the previously described adhesive properties of the cadherin superfamily. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Biological Chemistry
volume
279
issue
23
pages
24034 - 24043
publisher
ASBMB
external identifiers
  • wos:000221702500025
  • scopus:2642555545
ISSN
1083-351X
DOI
10.1074/jbc.M313878200
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f2a64334-0d86-4eee-b88f-02587b0da75e (old id 120959)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15047711&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-11 11:01:17
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:29:44
@article{f2a64334-0d86-4eee-b88f-02587b0da75e,
  abstract     = {Fat cadherins constitute a subclass of the large cadherin family characterized by the presence of 34 cadherin motifs. To date, three mammalian Fat cadherins have been described; however, only limited information is known about the function of these molecules. In this paper, we describe the second fat cadherin in Drosophila, fat-like (ftl). We show that ftl is the true orthologue of vertebrate fat-like genes, whereas the previously characterized tumor suppressor cadherin, fat, is more distantly related as compared with ftl. Ftl is a large molecule of 4705 amino acids. It is expressed apically in luminal tissues such as trachea, salivary glands, proventriculus, and hindgut. Silencing of ftl results in the collapse of tracheal epithelia giving rise to breaks, deletions, and sac-like structures. Other tubular organs such as proventriculus, salivary glands, and hindgut are also malformed or missing. These data suggest that Ftl is required for morphogenesis and maintenance of tubular structures of ectodermal origin and underline its similarity in function to a reported lethal mouse knock-out of fat1 where glomerular epithelial processes collapse. Based on our results, we propose a model where Ftl acts as a spacer to keep tubular epithelia apart rather than the previously described adhesive properties of the cadherin superfamily.},
  author       = {Castillejo-Lopez, Casimiro and Martinez Arias, Wilma and Baumgartner, Stefan},
  issn         = {1083-351X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {23},
  pages        = {24034--24043},
  publisher    = {ASBMB},
  series       = {Journal of Biological Chemistry},
  title        = {The fat-like gene of drosophila is the true orthologue of vertebrate fat cadherins and is involved in the formation of tubular organs.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M313878200},
  volume       = {279},
  year         = {2004},
}