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Phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase: an enzyme that catalyzes the acyl-CoA-independent formation of triacylglycerol in yeast and plants

Dahlqvist, A; Ståhl, U; Lenman, Marit LU ; Banas, A; Lee, M; Sandager, L; Ronne, H and Stymne, S (2000) In Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 97(12). p.6487-6492
Abstract
Triacylglycerol (TAG) is known to be synthesized in a reaction that uses acyl-CoA as acyl donor and diacylglycerol (DAG) as acceptor, and which is catalyzed by the enzyme acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase. We have found that some plants and yeast also have an acyl-CoA-independent mechanism for TAG synthesis, which uses phospholipids as acyl donors and DAG as acceptor. This reaction is catalyzed by an enzyme that we call phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, or PDAT. PDAT was characterized in microsomal preparations from three different oil seeds: sunflower, castor bean, and Crepis palaestina. We found that the specificity of the enzyme for the acyl group in the phospholipid varies between these species. Thus, C. palaestina... (More)
Triacylglycerol (TAG) is known to be synthesized in a reaction that uses acyl-CoA as acyl donor and diacylglycerol (DAG) as acceptor, and which is catalyzed by the enzyme acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase. We have found that some plants and yeast also have an acyl-CoA-independent mechanism for TAG synthesis, which uses phospholipids as acyl donors and DAG as acceptor. This reaction is catalyzed by an enzyme that we call phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, or PDAT. PDAT was characterized in microsomal preparations from three different oil seeds: sunflower, castor bean, and Crepis palaestina. We found that the specificity of the enzyme for the acyl group in the phospholipid varies between these species. Thus, C. palaestina PDAT preferentially incorporates vernoloyl groups into TAG, whereas PDAT from castor bean incorporates both ricinoleoyl and vernoloyl groups. We further found that PDAT activity also is present in yeast microsomes. The substrate specificity of this PDAT depends on the head group of the acyl donor, the acyl group transferred, and the acyl chains of the acceptor DAG. The gene encoding the enzyme was identified. The encoded PDAT protein is related to lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, which catalyzes the acyl-CoA-independent synthesis of cholesterol esters. However, budding yeast PDAT and its relatives in fission yeast and Arabidopsis form a distinct branch within this protein superfamily, indicating that a separate PDAT enzyme arose at an early point in evolution. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
volume
97
issue
12
pages
6487 - 6492
publisher
National Acad Sciences
external identifiers
  • scopus:0034612345
ISSN
1091-6490
DOI
10.1073/pnas.120067297
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
5eafe3f0-866f-4fe5-bfd3-e652e2d8ce93 (old id 1209892)
date added to LUP
2008-08-25 14:27:39
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:22:46
@article{5eafe3f0-866f-4fe5-bfd3-e652e2d8ce93,
  abstract     = {Triacylglycerol (TAG) is known to be synthesized in a reaction that uses acyl-CoA as acyl donor and diacylglycerol (DAG) as acceptor, and which is catalyzed by the enzyme acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase. We have found that some plants and yeast also have an acyl-CoA-independent mechanism for TAG synthesis, which uses phospholipids as acyl donors and DAG as acceptor. This reaction is catalyzed by an enzyme that we call phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, or PDAT. PDAT was characterized in microsomal preparations from three different oil seeds: sunflower, castor bean, and Crepis palaestina. We found that the specificity of the enzyme for the acyl group in the phospholipid varies between these species. Thus, C. palaestina PDAT preferentially incorporates vernoloyl groups into TAG, whereas PDAT from castor bean incorporates both ricinoleoyl and vernoloyl groups. We further found that PDAT activity also is present in yeast microsomes. The substrate specificity of this PDAT depends on the head group of the acyl donor, the acyl group transferred, and the acyl chains of the acceptor DAG. The gene encoding the enzyme was identified. The encoded PDAT protein is related to lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, which catalyzes the acyl-CoA-independent synthesis of cholesterol esters. However, budding yeast PDAT and its relatives in fission yeast and Arabidopsis form a distinct branch within this protein superfamily, indicating that a separate PDAT enzyme arose at an early point in evolution.},
  author       = {Dahlqvist, A and Ståhl, U and Lenman, Marit and Banas, A and Lee, M and Sandager, L and Ronne, H and Stymne, S},
  issn         = {1091-6490},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {6487--6492},
  publisher    = {National Acad Sciences},
  series       = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  title        = {Phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase: an enzyme that catalyzes the acyl-CoA-independent formation of triacylglycerol in yeast and plants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.120067297},
  volume       = {97},
  year         = {2000},
}