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Progress in the understanding of the protein C anticoagulant pathway.

Dahlbäck, Björn LU (2004) In International Journal of Hematology 79(2). p.109-116
Abstract
A natural anticoagulant pathway denoted the protein C system provides specific and efficient control of blood coagulation. Protein C is the key component of the system and circulates in the blood as a zymogen to an anticoagulant serine protease.Activation of protein C is achieved on the surface of endothelial cells by thrombin bound to the membrane protein thrombomodulin. The endothelial protein C receptor stimulates the activation of protein C on the endothelium. Activated protein C (APC) modulates blood coagulation by cleaving a limited number of peptide bonds in factor VIIIa (FVIIIa) and factor Va (FVa), cofactors in the activation of factor X and prothrombin, respectively.Vitamin K-dependent protein S stimulates the APC-mediated... (More)
A natural anticoagulant pathway denoted the protein C system provides specific and efficient control of blood coagulation. Protein C is the key component of the system and circulates in the blood as a zymogen to an anticoagulant serine protease.Activation of protein C is achieved on the surface of endothelial cells by thrombin bound to the membrane protein thrombomodulin. The endothelial protein C receptor stimulates the activation of protein C on the endothelium. Activated protein C (APC) modulates blood coagulation by cleaving a limited number of peptide bonds in factor VIIIa (FVIIIa) and factor Va (FVa), cofactors in the activation of factor X and prothrombin, respectively.Vitamin K-dependent protein S stimulates the APC-mediated regulation of coagulation. Not only is protein S involved in the degradation of FVIIIa, but so is FV, which in recent years has been found to be a Janus-faced protein with both procoagulant and anticoagulant potentials.A number of genetic defects affecting the anticoagulant function of the protein C system, eg,APC resistance (Arg506Gln or FV Leiden) and deficiencies of protein C and protein S constitute major risk factors of venous thrombosis.The protein C system also has anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic potentials,the molecular mechanisms of which are beginning to be unraveled.APC has emerged in recent years as a useful therapeutic compound in the treatment of severe septic shock.The beneficial effect of APC is believed be due to both its anticoagulant and its anti-inflammatory properties. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Hematology
volume
79
issue
2
pages
109 - 116
publisher
Carden Jennings Publishing Co., Ltd.
external identifiers
  • pmid:15005336
  • wos:000189189200002
  • scopus:18144440602
ISSN
0925-5710
DOI
10.1532/IJH97.03149
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
310799c1-12dd-4383-a3f8-eb22d05703d0 (old id 121489)
alternative location
http://cardenjennings.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&issn=0925-5710&volume=79&issue=2&spage=109
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 13:30:43
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:34:26
@article{310799c1-12dd-4383-a3f8-eb22d05703d0,
  abstract     = {A natural anticoagulant pathway denoted the protein C system provides specific and efficient control of blood coagulation. Protein C is the key component of the system and circulates in the blood as a zymogen to an anticoagulant serine protease.Activation of protein C is achieved on the surface of endothelial cells by thrombin bound to the membrane protein thrombomodulin. The endothelial protein C receptor stimulates the activation of protein C on the endothelium. Activated protein C (APC) modulates blood coagulation by cleaving a limited number of peptide bonds in factor VIIIa (FVIIIa) and factor Va (FVa), cofactors in the activation of factor X and prothrombin, respectively.Vitamin K-dependent protein S stimulates the APC-mediated regulation of coagulation. Not only is protein S involved in the degradation of FVIIIa, but so is FV, which in recent years has been found to be a Janus-faced protein with both procoagulant and anticoagulant potentials.A number of genetic defects affecting the anticoagulant function of the protein C system, eg,APC resistance (Arg506Gln or FV Leiden) and deficiencies of protein C and protein S constitute major risk factors of venous thrombosis.The protein C system also has anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic potentials,the molecular mechanisms of which are beginning to be unraveled.APC has emerged in recent years as a useful therapeutic compound in the treatment of severe septic shock.The beneficial effect of APC is believed be due to both its anticoagulant and its anti-inflammatory properties.},
  author       = {Dahlbäck, Björn},
  issn         = {0925-5710},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {109--116},
  publisher    = {Carden Jennings Publishing Co., Ltd.},
  series       = {International Journal of Hematology},
  title        = {Progress in the understanding of the protein C anticoagulant pathway.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1532/IJH97.03149},
  volume       = {79},
  year         = {2004},
}