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Interfacial Properties of Lipid Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles

Vandoolaeghe, Pauline LU (2008)
Abstract
Lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles are studied for their potential as biocompatible carriers for pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. Their potential as delivery vehicles is due to their nanometer size, their controllable structure and physical properties and their large carrying capacity of a wide range of molecules.

This study concerns the interaction of lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles (i) at solid/liquid interfaces, (ii) at model membranes and (iii) with peptides.

(i) The adsorption behavior of cubic phase nanoparticles based on glycerol monooleate (GMO) at the solid/liquid interface is highly dependent on the surface properties. At hydrophilic surfaces, the interactions are weak and the... (More)
Lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles are studied for their potential as biocompatible carriers for pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. Their potential as delivery vehicles is due to their nanometer size, their controllable structure and physical properties and their large carrying capacity of a wide range of molecules.

This study concerns the interaction of lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles (i) at solid/liquid interfaces, (ii) at model membranes and (iii) with peptides.

(i) The adsorption behavior of cubic phase nanoparticles based on glycerol monooleate (GMO) at the solid/liquid interface is highly dependent on the surface properties. At hydrophilic surfaces, the interactions are weak and the interfacial layer consists of patches of intact nanoparticles. The surface coverage is also affected by the solution conditions and particle size, and adsorption is observed only when the electrostatic interactions are screened. The adsorption mechanism involves two competing adsorption processes: the rapid adsorption of the residual free molecules of the stabilizing polymer and the adsorption of intact nanoparticles in the gaps left at the surface. The interactions with hydrophobic surfaces, on the other hand, are strong and attractive, leading to a collapse of the internal structure of the particle. This leads to a monolayer-type of structure at hydrophobic surfaces.

(ii) The interaction between GMO-based cubic phase nanoparticles and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers is a dynamic process. The particles initially adsorb at the bilayer surface. Interfacial exchange occurs, where GMO is delivered into the bilayer and DOPC is extracted by the nanoparticles. A subsequent release of the nanoparticles is observed, which is attributed to a local phase separation at the interface. Studies of interactions with bilayers of different coverage and with vesicles at different DOPC:GMO ratios have revealed structural changes of the GMO cubic structure, with a transition from the cubic phase to a lamellar structure upon lipid mixing.

(iii) A case study of the interactions of liquid crystalline nanoparticles formed from soya phosphatidylcholine and glycerol dioleate with two different peptides has shown that the use of the carrier increases the in vivo circulation time of the peptides. Therefore applications of the delivery system represent an interesting alternative to chemical modifications of in vivo sensitive therapeutically interesting peptides. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
supervisor
opponent
  • Prof. Lee, Ka Yee, Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, USA
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
interaction, adsorption, surface, peptide, bilayer, cubic phase, monoolein, cubosome, lipid, liquid crystalline nanoparticles, ellipsometry, neutron reflectivity, QCM-D, SAXD
pages
196 pages
publisher
Lund University
defense location
Kemicentrum, Hall B
defense date
2008-09-19 10:30
ISBN
978-91-628-7575-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
42cd81a8-fbce-4f56-a4fd-efec5e4a6ef2 (old id 1219016)
date added to LUP
2008-08-26 10:23:37
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:45:03
@phdthesis{42cd81a8-fbce-4f56-a4fd-efec5e4a6ef2,
  abstract     = {Lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles are studied for their potential as biocompatible carriers for pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic applications. Their potential as delivery vehicles is due to their nanometer size, their controllable structure and physical properties and their large carrying capacity of a wide range of molecules. <br/><br>
This study concerns the interaction of lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles (i) at solid/liquid interfaces, (ii) at model membranes and (iii) with peptides.<br/><br>
(i) The adsorption behavior of cubic phase nanoparticles based on glycerol monooleate (GMO) at the solid/liquid interface is highly dependent on the surface properties. At hydrophilic surfaces, the interactions are weak and the interfacial layer consists of patches of intact nanoparticles. The surface coverage is also affected by the solution conditions and particle size, and adsorption is observed only when the electrostatic interactions are screened. The adsorption mechanism involves two competing adsorption processes: the rapid adsorption of the residual free molecules of the stabilizing polymer and the adsorption of intact nanoparticles in the gaps left at the surface. The interactions with hydrophobic surfaces, on the other hand, are strong and attractive, leading to a collapse of the internal structure of the particle. This leads to a monolayer-type of structure at hydrophobic surfaces. <br/><br>
(ii) The interaction between GMO-based cubic phase nanoparticles and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers is a dynamic process. The particles initially adsorb at the bilayer surface. Interfacial exchange occurs, where GMO is delivered into the bilayer and DOPC is extracted by the nanoparticles. A subsequent release of the nanoparticles is observed, which is attributed to a local phase separation at the interface. Studies of interactions with bilayers of different coverage and with vesicles at different DOPC:GMO ratios have revealed structural changes of the GMO cubic structure, with a transition from the cubic phase to a lamellar structure upon lipid mixing.<br/><br>
(iii) A case study of the interactions of liquid crystalline nanoparticles formed from soya phosphatidylcholine and glycerol dioleate with two different peptides has shown that the use of the carrier increases the in vivo circulation time of the peptides. Therefore applications of the delivery system represent an interesting alternative to chemical modifications of in vivo sensitive therapeutically interesting peptides.},
  author       = {Vandoolaeghe, Pauline},
  isbn         = {978-91-628-7575-6},
  keyword      = {interaction,adsorption,surface,peptide,bilayer,cubic phase,monoolein,cubosome,lipid,liquid crystalline nanoparticles,ellipsometry,neutron reflectivity,QCM-D,SAXD},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {196},
  publisher    = {Lund University},
  school       = {Lund University},
  title        = {Interfacial Properties of Lipid Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles},
  year         = {2008},
}