Advanced

Childhood obesity: from nutrition to behaviour.

Flodmark, Carl-Erik LU and Ohlsson, Torsten (2008) In Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 67. p.356-362
Abstract
Obesity in children is difficult to treat, but it seems to be easier to treat than adult obesity. The first step in treatment is to identify effective advice relating to nutrition and physical activity. In most treatment studies the macronutrient composition of the diet is not of major importance for treatment outcome. In relation to physical activity fat-utilisation strategies have been described. The second step includes appropriate approaches to lifestyle change. In Europe there are no drugs approved for children, and surgery for children is still limited to research projects. Thus, the major challenge is to develop effective ways of changing lifestyle. Family therapy may be an effective approach in preventing severe obesity from... (More)
Obesity in children is difficult to treat, but it seems to be easier to treat than adult obesity. The first step in treatment is to identify effective advice relating to nutrition and physical activity. In most treatment studies the macronutrient composition of the diet is not of major importance for treatment outcome. In relation to physical activity fat-utilisation strategies have been described. The second step includes appropriate approaches to lifestyle change. In Europe there are no drugs approved for children, and surgery for children is still limited to research projects. Thus, the major challenge is to develop effective ways of changing lifestyle. Family therapy may be an effective approach in preventing severe obesity from developing during puberty, and a therapeutic strategy based on treatment studies is described. The family-therapy techniques used here are intended to facilitate the family's own attempts to modify their lifestyle, and to increase their own sense of responsibility and readiness to change, i.e. these variables are the prime targets during therapy. Thus, the family, not the therapist, assumes responsibility for the changes achieved. This approach may be helpful in making the therapeutic process less cumbersome for the therapist. Instead of the therapist attempting to persuade the obese subjects to lose weight, it might be more effective to teach them to control their eating patterns through their own efforts. The treatment model includes structural family therapy and solution-focused-brief therapy. The use of such a model makes it possible to train therapists and health professionals to use an evidence-based intervention model. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
volume
67
pages
356 - 362
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000260777200004
  • pmid:18715520
  • scopus:53849139425
ISSN
0029-6651
DOI
10.1017/S0029665108008653
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
40c79813-42ed-4c79-a9e4-23cd758e0baf (old id 1223048)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18715520?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-09-03 13:08:15
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:38:24
@article{40c79813-42ed-4c79-a9e4-23cd758e0baf,
  abstract     = {Obesity in children is difficult to treat, but it seems to be easier to treat than adult obesity. The first step in treatment is to identify effective advice relating to nutrition and physical activity. In most treatment studies the macronutrient composition of the diet is not of major importance for treatment outcome. In relation to physical activity fat-utilisation strategies have been described. The second step includes appropriate approaches to lifestyle change. In Europe there are no drugs approved for children, and surgery for children is still limited to research projects. Thus, the major challenge is to develop effective ways of changing lifestyle. Family therapy may be an effective approach in preventing severe obesity from developing during puberty, and a therapeutic strategy based on treatment studies is described. The family-therapy techniques used here are intended to facilitate the family's own attempts to modify their lifestyle, and to increase their own sense of responsibility and readiness to change, i.e. these variables are the prime targets during therapy. Thus, the family, not the therapist, assumes responsibility for the changes achieved. This approach may be helpful in making the therapeutic process less cumbersome for the therapist. Instead of the therapist attempting to persuade the obese subjects to lose weight, it might be more effective to teach them to control their eating patterns through their own efforts. The treatment model includes structural family therapy and solution-focused-brief therapy. The use of such a model makes it possible to train therapists and health professionals to use an evidence-based intervention model.},
  author       = {Flodmark, Carl-Erik and Ohlsson, Torsten},
  issn         = {0029-6651},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {356--362},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Proceedings of the Nutrition Society},
  title        = {Childhood obesity: from nutrition to behaviour.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0029665108008653},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2008},
}