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Exploring the context of the lung proteome within the airway mucosa following allergen challenge.

Fehniger, Thomas E; Sato-Folatre, José-Gabriel; Malmström, Johan LU ; Berglund, Magnus LU ; Lindberg, Claes; Brange, Charlotte; Lindberg, Henrik and Marko-Varga, György (2004) In Journal of Proteome Research 3(2). p.307-320
Abstract
The lung proteome is a dynamic collection of specialized proteins related to pulmonary function. Many cells of different derivations, activation states, and levels of maturity contribute to the changing environment, which produces the lung proteome. Inflammatory cells reacting to environmental challenge, for example from allergens, produce and secrete proteins which have profound effects on both resident and nonresident cells located in airways, alveoli, and the vascular tree which provides blood cells to the parenchyma alveolar bed for gas exchange. In an experimental model of allergic airway inflammation, we have compared control and allergen challenged lung compartments to determine global protein expression patterns using 2D-gel... (More)
The lung proteome is a dynamic collection of specialized proteins related to pulmonary function. Many cells of different derivations, activation states, and levels of maturity contribute to the changing environment, which produces the lung proteome. Inflammatory cells reacting to environmental challenge, for example from allergens, produce and secrete proteins which have profound effects on both resident and nonresident cells located in airways, alveoli, and the vascular tree which provides blood cells to the parenchyma alveolar bed for gas exchange. In an experimental model of allergic airway inflammation, we have compared control and allergen challenged lung compartments to determine global protein expression patterns using 2D-gel electrophoresis and subsequent spot identification by MS/MS mass spectrometry. We have then specifically isolated the epithelial mucosal layer, which lines conducting airways, from control and allergen challenged lungs, using laser capture technology and performed proteome identification on these selected cell samples. A central component of our investigations has been to contextually relate the histological features of the dynamic pulmonary environment to the changes in protein expression observed following challenge. Our results provide new information of the complexity of the submucosa/epithelium interface and the mechanisms behind the transformation of airway epithelium from normal steady states to functionally activated states. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
lung, mucosa, epithelium, laser capture microscopy, proteome mass spectrometry, annotation identity, allergen
in
Journal of Proteome Research
volume
3
issue
2
pages
307 - 320
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000220833000018
  • scopus:5644247158
ISSN
1535-3893
DOI
10.1021/pr0499702
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c46f32f8-2ecd-4be9-b644-de1e09e9ad24 (old id 122350)
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 10:29:12
date last changed
2017-05-28 03:42:37
@article{c46f32f8-2ecd-4be9-b644-de1e09e9ad24,
  abstract     = {The lung proteome is a dynamic collection of specialized proteins related to pulmonary function. Many cells of different derivations, activation states, and levels of maturity contribute to the changing environment, which produces the lung proteome. Inflammatory cells reacting to environmental challenge, for example from allergens, produce and secrete proteins which have profound effects on both resident and nonresident cells located in airways, alveoli, and the vascular tree which provides blood cells to the parenchyma alveolar bed for gas exchange. In an experimental model of allergic airway inflammation, we have compared control and allergen challenged lung compartments to determine global protein expression patterns using 2D-gel electrophoresis and subsequent spot identification by MS/MS mass spectrometry. We have then specifically isolated the epithelial mucosal layer, which lines conducting airways, from control and allergen challenged lungs, using laser capture technology and performed proteome identification on these selected cell samples. A central component of our investigations has been to contextually relate the histological features of the dynamic pulmonary environment to the changes in protein expression observed following challenge. Our results provide new information of the complexity of the submucosa/epithelium interface and the mechanisms behind the transformation of airway epithelium from normal steady states to functionally activated states.},
  author       = {Fehniger, Thomas E and Sato-Folatre, José-Gabriel and Malmström, Johan and Berglund, Magnus and Lindberg, Claes and Brange, Charlotte and Lindberg, Henrik and Marko-Varga, György},
  issn         = {1535-3893},
  keyword      = {lung,mucosa,epithelium,laser capture microscopy,proteome  mass spectrometry,annotation identity,allergen},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {307--320},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {Journal of Proteome Research},
  title        = {Exploring the context of the lung proteome within the airway mucosa following allergen challenge.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr0499702},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2004},
}