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Role of vasoactive intestinal peptide and inflammatory mediators in enteric neuronal plasticity.

Ekblad, Eva LU and Bauer, A J (2004) In Neurogastroenterology and Motility 16(Suppl 1). p.123-128
Abstract
Complex circuits involving both local intrinsic neurones (i.e. enteric nervous system; ENS) and extrinsic neurones achieve nervous control of digestive functions. The ENS is comprised of many functionally different types of neurons: sensory neurons, interneurons and secreto-motor neurons. Each neuronal population is required to manifest local reflex behavior and is central to the regulation of both motor and secretory activities. It must be emphasized, however, that not only muscle and secretory cells but also other intestinal cells are targeted by enteric neurones, i.e. endocrine cells, interstitial cells of Cajal, immune cells, blood vessels and enteric glia. In addition to the ENS the gastrointestinal tract receives an extrinsic... (More)
Complex circuits involving both local intrinsic neurones (i.e. enteric nervous system; ENS) and extrinsic neurones achieve nervous control of digestive functions. The ENS is comprised of many functionally different types of neurons: sensory neurons, interneurons and secreto-motor neurons. Each neuronal population is required to manifest local reflex behavior and is central to the regulation of both motor and secretory activities. It must be emphasized, however, that not only muscle and secretory cells but also other intestinal cells are targeted by enteric neurones, i.e. endocrine cells, interstitial cells of Cajal, immune cells, blood vessels and enteric glia. In addition to the ENS the gastrointestinal tract receives an extrinsic innervation by sympathetic, parasympathetic and sensory fibres. Neuronal projections from the intestine to prevertebral ganglia also exist. Taken together, the picture of a complex nervous regulation of digestive functions highly integrated with the central nervous system and the rest of the autonomic nervous system has emerged. The ENS is adaptive and plastic, but also vulnerable, system and ENS disturbances may be of pathogenic importance in functional bowel disease. In particular the interplay between the enteric neurones and the immune cells is suggested to be of crucial importance. The review discusses possible roles of the mediators vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and prostanoids in ENS plasticity in response to injury and inflammation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Neurogastroenterology and Motility
volume
16
issue
Suppl 1
pages
123 - 128
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000220715000023
  • scopus:2342534336
ISSN
1350-1925
DOI
10.1111/j.1743-3150.2004.00487.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
447754e4-e542-4d94-b495-0481468af85f (old id 122830)
date added to LUP
2007-07-11 14:39:27
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:37:48
@article{447754e4-e542-4d94-b495-0481468af85f,
  abstract     = {Complex circuits involving both local intrinsic neurones (i.e. enteric nervous system; ENS) and extrinsic neurones achieve nervous control of digestive functions. The ENS is comprised of many functionally different types of neurons: sensory neurons, interneurons and secreto-motor neurons. Each neuronal population is required to manifest local reflex behavior and is central to the regulation of both motor and secretory activities. It must be emphasized, however, that not only muscle and secretory cells but also other intestinal cells are targeted by enteric neurones, i.e. endocrine cells, interstitial cells of Cajal, immune cells, blood vessels and enteric glia. In addition to the ENS the gastrointestinal tract receives an extrinsic innervation by sympathetic, parasympathetic and sensory fibres. Neuronal projections from the intestine to prevertebral ganglia also exist. Taken together, the picture of a complex nervous regulation of digestive functions highly integrated with the central nervous system and the rest of the autonomic nervous system has emerged. The ENS is adaptive and plastic, but also vulnerable, system and ENS disturbances may be of pathogenic importance in functional bowel disease. In particular the interplay between the enteric neurones and the immune cells is suggested to be of crucial importance. The review discusses possible roles of the mediators vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and prostanoids in ENS plasticity in response to injury and inflammation.},
  author       = {Ekblad, Eva and Bauer, A J},
  issn         = {1350-1925},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Suppl 1},
  pages        = {123--128},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Neurogastroenterology and Motility},
  title        = {Role of vasoactive intestinal peptide and inflammatory mediators in enteric neuronal plasticity.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1743-3150.2004.00487.x},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2004},
}