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What the Gulf Ruling Familes Do When They Rule

Khalaf, Abdulhadi LU (2003) In Orient 44 Jahrgang(Nr. 4). p.537-554
Abstract
This essay argues that Gulf monarchies have, hitherto, managed to maintain stability of their regimes. This was made possible by the extraordinary financial and political resources that enabled the Gulf states of combing traditional despotism with the powers of modern welfare states. The geo-political context within which they have operated has changed considerably, albeit gradually during the past decade or so. The Gulf ruling families’ remarkable capacity to mobilise external and internal sources of power seems to have also reached its limits.

Gulf ruling families are facing some unprecedented demands by domestic and external actors for political and economic reforms. Uncharacteristically, the most vocal actors are several of... (More)
This essay argues that Gulf monarchies have, hitherto, managed to maintain stability of their regimes. This was made possible by the extraordinary financial and political resources that enabled the Gulf states of combing traditional despotism with the powers of modern welfare states. The geo-political context within which they have operated has changed considerably, albeit gradually during the past decade or so. The Gulf ruling families’ remarkable capacity to mobilise external and internal sources of power seems to have also reached its limits.

Gulf ruling families are facing some unprecedented demands by domestic and external actors for political and economic reforms. Uncharacteristically, the most vocal actors are several of the previously marginalized elite groups that feel emboldened by the ramifications of political developments since 1990 and particularly since September 11, 2001.

There is a growing awareness among important members of the Gulf ruling families that their survival requires introducing some real, albeit painful, reforms. Political reforms in Bahrain since 2000 present a model for the kind of measures that do not require the ruling families to give up any of their privileges including their control over economic resources and political institutions as well as their command over the armed forces and the security apparatuses. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bahrain, Political reforms, Rent, GCC, Transition, Rentier State
in
Orient
volume
44 Jahrgang
issue
Nr. 4
pages
537 - 554
publisher
Deutsches Orient-Institut, Hamburg
ISSN
0030-5227
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a32f6693-54f1-4771-b4db-09e45d06ff0e (old id 122962)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 12:41:24
date last changed
2016-04-16 04:26:10
@article{a32f6693-54f1-4771-b4db-09e45d06ff0e,
  abstract     = {This essay argues that Gulf monarchies have, hitherto, managed to maintain stability of their regimes. This was made possible by the extraordinary financial and political resources that enabled the Gulf states of combing traditional despotism with the powers of modern welfare states. The geo-political context within which they have operated has changed considerably, albeit gradually during the past decade or so. The Gulf ruling families’ remarkable capacity to mobilise external and internal sources of power seems to have also reached its limits.<br/><br>
Gulf ruling families are facing some unprecedented demands by domestic and external actors for political and economic reforms. Uncharacteristically, the most vocal actors are several of the previously marginalized elite groups that feel emboldened by the ramifications of political developments since 1990 and particularly since September 11, 2001.<br/><br>
There is a growing awareness among important members of the Gulf ruling families that their survival requires introducing some real, albeit painful, reforms. Political reforms in Bahrain since 2000 present a model for the kind of measures that do not require the ruling families to give up any of their privileges including their control over economic resources and political institutions as well as their command over the armed forces and the security apparatuses.},
  author       = {Khalaf, Abdulhadi},
  issn         = {0030-5227},
  keyword      = {Bahrain,Political reforms,Rent,GCC,Transition,Rentier State},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Nr. 4},
  pages        = {537--554},
  publisher    = {Deutsches Orient-Institut, Hamburg},
  series       = {Orient},
  title        = {What the Gulf Ruling Familes Do When They Rule},
  volume       = {44 Jahrgang},
  year         = {2003},
}