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Fetal growth predicts stress susceptibility independent of parental education in 161 991 adolescent Swedish male conscripts.

Nilsson, P M; Nilsson, J-Å; Östergren, Per-Olof LU and Rasmussen, F (2004) In Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 58(7). p.571-573
Abstract
Psychosocial stress could lead to a wide range of possible physiological reactions, due to both the total burden of stress as well as individual susceptibility. Two useful Swedish registers to investigate early life influences on stress susceptibility are the Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR) and the Military Service Conscription Register (MSCR). In a previous study we showed a positive relation between fetal growth and psychological functioning (PF) including an assessment of stress susceptibility.1 However, in that study we did not adjust for family social class—nor did another related study.2 We have therefore now carried out such an analysis in an expanded cohort study, by adding parental educational level as a marker of family... (More)
Psychosocial stress could lead to a wide range of possible physiological reactions, due to both the total burden of stress as well as individual susceptibility. Two useful Swedish registers to investigate early life influences on stress susceptibility are the Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR) and the Military Service Conscription Register (MSCR). In a previous study we showed a positive relation between fetal growth and psychological functioning (PF) including an assessment of stress susceptibility.1 However, in that study we did not adjust for family social class—nor did another related study.2 We have therefore now carried out such an analysis in an expanded cohort study, by adding parental educational level as a marker of family social class. The aim was to investigate independent associations between fetal growth and stress susceptibility in young men. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
adolescence, birth weight, conscript, psychological function, stress susceptibility
in
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
volume
58
issue
7
pages
571 - 573
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000222021500009
  • pmid:15194718
  • scopus:3042572545
ISSN
1470-2738
DOI
10.1136/jech.2003.015495
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
68d5934e-e082-4faf-9093-d2d7a9f2059c (old id 124184)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 16:23:43
date last changed
2017-01-15 03:37:04
@article{68d5934e-e082-4faf-9093-d2d7a9f2059c,
  abstract     = {Psychosocial stress could lead to a wide range of possible physiological reactions, due to both the total burden of stress as well as individual susceptibility. Two useful Swedish registers to investigate early life influences on stress susceptibility are the Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR) and the Military Service Conscription Register (MSCR). In a previous study we showed a positive relation between fetal growth and psychological functioning (PF) including an assessment of stress susceptibility.1 However, in that study we did not adjust for family social class—nor did another related study.2 We have therefore now carried out such an analysis in an expanded cohort study, by adding parental educational level as a marker of family social class. The aim was to investigate independent associations between fetal growth and stress susceptibility in young men.},
  author       = {Nilsson, P M and Nilsson, J-Å and Östergren, Per-Olof and Rasmussen, F},
  issn         = {1470-2738},
  keyword      = {adolescence,birth weight,conscript,psychological function,stress susceptibility},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {571--573},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health},
  title        = {Fetal growth predicts stress susceptibility independent of parental education in 161 991 adolescent Swedish male conscripts.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.2003.015495},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2004},
}