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Association of physician's sex with risk factor control in treated hypertensive patients from Swedish primary healthcare.

Journath, Gunilla; Hellénius, Mai-Lis; Manhem, Karin; Kjellgren, Karin and Nilsson, Peter LU (2008) In Journal of Hypertension 26(10). p.2050-2056
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the association of physician's sex with blood pressure, lipid control, and cardiovascular risk factors in treated hypertensive men and women, stratified for the sex of their physician. METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey of hypertensive patients, 264 primary care physicians (PCPs), 187 men and 77 women from across Sweden, recruited 6537 treated hypertensive patients (48% men) during 2002-2005, consecutively collected from medical records and registered on a web-based form connected to a central database. Patients were included consecutively in the same order as they visited the healthcare centre. RESULTS: Hypertensive women more often reached target systolic/diastolic blood pressure levels (<140/90 mmHg) when... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To study the association of physician's sex with blood pressure, lipid control, and cardiovascular risk factors in treated hypertensive men and women, stratified for the sex of their physician. METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey of hypertensive patients, 264 primary care physicians (PCPs), 187 men and 77 women from across Sweden, recruited 6537 treated hypertensive patients (48% men) during 2002-2005, consecutively collected from medical records and registered on a web-based form connected to a central database. Patients were included consecutively in the same order as they visited the healthcare centre. RESULTS: Hypertensive women more often reached target systolic/diastolic blood pressure levels (<140/90 mmHg) when treated by female PCPs than when they were treated by male PCPs (32 vs. 24%, P < 0.001). This difference remained when comparing female and male physicians' nondiabetic female patients. Both male and female patients had better control of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels when treated by female PCPs than when treated by male PCPs (total cholesterol <5 mmol/l: women 30 vs. 24%, P < 0.001; men 42 vs. 34%, P < 0.001; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <3 mmol/l: women 39 vs. 33%, P < 0.01; men 41 vs. 35%, P < 0.05). Female PCPs had a higher proportion of treated hypertensive patients with diabetes than did male PCPs but male PCPs had a higher prevalence of treated hypertensive men with microalbuminuria compared with female PCPs. CONCLUSION: Female physicians appeared more often to reach the treatment goal for blood pressure in female patients and cholesterol levels in all patients than did male physicians. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Hypertension
volume
26
issue
10
pages
2050 - 2056
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000259796700020
  • pmid:18806630
  • scopus:58149122946
ISSN
1473-5598
DOI
10.1097/HJH.0b013e32830a4a3b
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9cbf7bf3-b70f-49ed-ad5c-bcb028d28216 (old id 1242790)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18806630?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-07-08 16:04:39
date last changed
2017-08-27 05:02:25
@article{9cbf7bf3-b70f-49ed-ad5c-bcb028d28216,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To study the association of physician's sex with blood pressure, lipid control, and cardiovascular risk factors in treated hypertensive men and women, stratified for the sex of their physician. METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey of hypertensive patients, 264 primary care physicians (PCPs), 187 men and 77 women from across Sweden, recruited 6537 treated hypertensive patients (48% men) during 2002-2005, consecutively collected from medical records and registered on a web-based form connected to a central database. Patients were included consecutively in the same order as they visited the healthcare centre. RESULTS: Hypertensive women more often reached target systolic/diastolic blood pressure levels (&lt;140/90 mmHg) when treated by female PCPs than when they were treated by male PCPs (32 vs. 24%, P &lt; 0.001). This difference remained when comparing female and male physicians' nondiabetic female patients. Both male and female patients had better control of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels when treated by female PCPs than when treated by male PCPs (total cholesterol &lt;5 mmol/l: women 30 vs. 24%, P &lt; 0.001; men 42 vs. 34%, P &lt; 0.001; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol &lt;3 mmol/l: women 39 vs. 33%, P &lt; 0.01; men 41 vs. 35%, P &lt; 0.05). Female PCPs had a higher proportion of treated hypertensive patients with diabetes than did male PCPs but male PCPs had a higher prevalence of treated hypertensive men with microalbuminuria compared with female PCPs. CONCLUSION: Female physicians appeared more often to reach the treatment goal for blood pressure in female patients and cholesterol levels in all patients than did male physicians.},
  author       = {Journath, Gunilla and Hellénius, Mai-Lis and Manhem, Karin and Kjellgren, Karin and Nilsson, Peter},
  issn         = {1473-5598},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2050--2056},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of Hypertension},
  title        = {Association of physician's sex with risk factor control in treated hypertensive patients from Swedish primary healthcare.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0b013e32830a4a3b},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2008},
}