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Effect on gait and socket comfort in unilateral trans-tibial amputees after exchange to a polyurethane concept.

Åström, Ingrid LU and Stenström, Anders LU (2004) In Prosthetics and Orthotics International 28(1). p.28-36
Abstract
Trans-tibial amputees with different indications for amputation often have stump problems. Many active amputees have limits in daily life and sports activities because of pressure ulcers, friction, allergic dermatitis or volume changes. Many methods and materials have been tried to make a well-fitted socket. A new polyurethane concept had been designed with a shock absorbing effect. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare a conventional suspension with a polyurethane concept with regard to the amputees' satisfaction, socket comfort, physical capacity and to analyse the long-term effect. The total material includes 29 unilateral trans-tibial amputees. They answered a questionnaire after 2 months use of the polyurethane concept... (More)
Trans-tibial amputees with different indications for amputation often have stump problems. Many active amputees have limits in daily life and sports activities because of pressure ulcers, friction, allergic dermatitis or volume changes. Many methods and materials have been tried to make a well-fitted socket. A new polyurethane concept had been designed with a shock absorbing effect. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare a conventional suspension with a polyurethane concept with regard to the amputees' satisfaction, socket comfort, physical capacity and to analyse the long-term effect. The total material includes 29 unilateral trans-tibial amputees. They answered a questionnaire after 2 months use of the polyurethane concept and were interviewed after 3 and 5 years. After 3 years 22 amputees and after 5 years 20 amputees used the polyurethane concept. Gait was registered in 7 amputees. Speed and symmetry index (SI) for temporal, stride and kinematics variables were used to evaluate gait. The amputees reported that the polyurethane concept was better or much better in physical capacity in 117 (67%) and socket comfort was better or much better in 119 (82%) compared with the conventional suspension. There was no obvious symmetry difference in gait variables in speed, step length, step time or single support or in kinematics knee variables. The amputees tended to walk faster, decrease in symmetry in temporal and stride variables and increase in symmetry in kinematics variables with the polyurethane concept. After 5 years 6 had died and 20 amputees of the surviving 23 used the polyurethane concept. Conclusions: The polyurethane concept increased comfort considerably and physical activity increased when the trans-tibial amputees changed from conventional suspension. Gait registration was not useful to evaluate the amputees' satisfaction or socket comfort. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Prosthetics and Orthotics International
volume
28
issue
1
pages
28 - 36
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • pmid:15171575
  • wos:000221337000006
  • scopus:2342634387
ISSN
1746-1553
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fa56d9b6-62b1-4ccf-b38d-0c4919831dc4 (old id 124462)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15171575&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-03 10:22:32
date last changed
2017-02-19 04:15:50
@article{fa56d9b6-62b1-4ccf-b38d-0c4919831dc4,
  abstract     = {Trans-tibial amputees with different indications for amputation often have stump problems. Many active amputees have limits in daily life and sports activities because of pressure ulcers, friction, allergic dermatitis or volume changes. Many methods and materials have been tried to make a well-fitted socket. A new polyurethane concept had been designed with a shock absorbing effect. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare a conventional suspension with a polyurethane concept with regard to the amputees' satisfaction, socket comfort, physical capacity and to analyse the long-term effect. The total material includes 29 unilateral trans-tibial amputees. They answered a questionnaire after 2 months use of the polyurethane concept and were interviewed after 3 and 5 years. After 3 years 22 amputees and after 5 years 20 amputees used the polyurethane concept. Gait was registered in 7 amputees. Speed and symmetry index (SI) for temporal, stride and kinematics variables were used to evaluate gait. The amputees reported that the polyurethane concept was better or much better in physical capacity in 117 (67%) and socket comfort was better or much better in 119 (82%) compared with the conventional suspension. There was no obvious symmetry difference in gait variables in speed, step length, step time or single support or in kinematics knee variables. The amputees tended to walk faster, decrease in symmetry in temporal and stride variables and increase in symmetry in kinematics variables with the polyurethane concept. After 5 years 6 had died and 20 amputees of the surviving 23 used the polyurethane concept. Conclusions: The polyurethane concept increased comfort considerably and physical activity increased when the trans-tibial amputees changed from conventional suspension. Gait registration was not useful to evaluate the amputees' satisfaction or socket comfort.},
  author       = {Åström, Ingrid and Stenström, Anders},
  issn         = {1746-1553},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {28--36},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Prosthetics and Orthotics International},
  title        = {Effect on gait and socket comfort in unilateral trans-tibial amputees after exchange to a polyurethane concept.},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2004},
}