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Increased abdominal obesity, adverse psychosocial factors and shorter telomere length in subjects reporting early ageing; the MONICA Northern Sweden Study

Nordfjall, K.; Eliasson, M.; Stegmayr, B.; Lundin, S.; Roos, G. and Nilsson, Peter LU (2008) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 36(7). p.744-752
Abstract
Background: The rate of biological ageing is individual and represents the steady decrease in physiological and mental functions. Adverse social factors have been shown to influence this process. Self-perceived early ageing (SEA) might be a useful indicator of early biological ageing and increased mortality risk. The aim of this population-based study was to identify markers of SEA, including telomere length. Methods: We studied 1502 subjects (744 men, 758 women) from Northern Sweden. These subjects underwent a physical examination, blood sampling (including telomere length) and completed a self-administered questionnaire about their subjective age, social situation, lifestyle, and self-rated health (SRH). Age- and SRH-adjusted statistical... (More)
Background: The rate of biological ageing is individual and represents the steady decrease in physiological and mental functions. Adverse social factors have been shown to influence this process. Self-perceived early ageing (SEA) might be a useful indicator of early biological ageing and increased mortality risk. The aim of this population-based study was to identify markers of SEA, including telomere length. Methods: We studied 1502 subjects (744 men, 758 women) from Northern Sweden. These subjects underwent a physical examination, blood sampling (including telomere length) and completed a self-administered questionnaire about their subjective age, social situation, lifestyle, and self-rated health (SRH). Age- and SRH-adjusted statistical analyses were made comparing SEA subjects with same-sex controls. Results: In all, 7.9% of men and 12.1% of women reported SEA. These subjects had significantly (p < 0.0001) wider waist circumference and higher body mass index than controls. SEA men showed higher fasting glucose and SEA women showed higher total cholesterol levels than controls (p=0.020 and p=0.015, respectively). In addition, SEA women more often reported infrequent physical exercise (p=0.006), mental problems (p=0.064) and worse SRH (p=0.001) than controls. In a random sub-sample, telomere length was significantly shorter in SEA subjects (n=139) than controls (n=301; p=0.02), but not after full adjustment for BMI. Conclusions: Self-perceived early ageing is not uncommon and is associated with abdominal obesity, poor self-rated health, lower education, and shorter telomere length. This could link adverse social factors with features of the metabolic syndrome as well as with early biological ageing, of importance for targeting preventive programmes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
social, smoking, self-perceived, ageing, metabolic syndrome, telomere, length
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
36
issue
7
pages
744 - 752
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000259231900011
  • scopus:51049117543
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1177/1403494808090634
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b99c122f-7a4b-4e82-8f52-f51c2fa590b7 (old id 1246049)
date added to LUP
2008-11-18 15:02:05
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:01:45
@article{b99c122f-7a4b-4e82-8f52-f51c2fa590b7,
  abstract     = {Background: The rate of biological ageing is individual and represents the steady decrease in physiological and mental functions. Adverse social factors have been shown to influence this process. Self-perceived early ageing (SEA) might be a useful indicator of early biological ageing and increased mortality risk. The aim of this population-based study was to identify markers of SEA, including telomere length. Methods: We studied 1502 subjects (744 men, 758 women) from Northern Sweden. These subjects underwent a physical examination, blood sampling (including telomere length) and completed a self-administered questionnaire about their subjective age, social situation, lifestyle, and self-rated health (SRH). Age- and SRH-adjusted statistical analyses were made comparing SEA subjects with same-sex controls. Results: In all, 7.9% of men and 12.1% of women reported SEA. These subjects had significantly (p &lt; 0.0001) wider waist circumference and higher body mass index than controls. SEA men showed higher fasting glucose and SEA women showed higher total cholesterol levels than controls (p=0.020 and p=0.015, respectively). In addition, SEA women more often reported infrequent physical exercise (p=0.006), mental problems (p=0.064) and worse SRH (p=0.001) than controls. In a random sub-sample, telomere length was significantly shorter in SEA subjects (n=139) than controls (n=301; p=0.02), but not after full adjustment for BMI. Conclusions: Self-perceived early ageing is not uncommon and is associated with abdominal obesity, poor self-rated health, lower education, and shorter telomere length. This could link adverse social factors with features of the metabolic syndrome as well as with early biological ageing, of importance for targeting preventive programmes.},
  author       = {Nordfjall, K. and Eliasson, M. and Stegmayr, B. and Lundin, S. and Roos, G. and Nilsson, Peter},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  keyword      = {social,smoking,self-perceived,ageing,metabolic syndrome,telomere,length},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {744--752},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Increased abdominal obesity, adverse psychosocial factors and shorter telomere length in subjects reporting early ageing; the MONICA Northern Sweden Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494808090634},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2008},
}