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Isolation of progenitor cells from GFP-Transgenic pigs and transplantation to the retina of allorecipients

Klassen, Henry; Warfvinge, Karin LU ; Schwartz, Philip H.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Shamie, Neda; Jiang, Caihui; Samuel, Melissa; Scherfig, Erik; Prather, Randall S. and Young, Michael J. (2008) In Cloning and Stem Cells 10(3). p.391-402
Abstract
Work in rodents has demonstrated that progenitor transplantation can achieve limited photoreceptor replacement in the mammalian retina; however, replication of these findings on a clinically relevant scale requires a large animal model. To evaluate the ability of porcine retinal progenitor cells to survival as allografts and integrate into the host retinal architecture, we isolated donor cells from fetal green fluorescent protein (GFP)transgenic pigs. Cultures were propagated from the brain, retina, and corneo-scleral limbus. GFP expression rapidly increased with time in culture, although lower in conjunction with photoreceptor markers and filial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), thus suggesting downregulation of GFP during differentiation.... (More)
Work in rodents has demonstrated that progenitor transplantation can achieve limited photoreceptor replacement in the mammalian retina; however, replication of these findings on a clinically relevant scale requires a large animal model. To evaluate the ability of porcine retinal progenitor cells to survival as allografts and integrate into the host retinal architecture, we isolated donor cells from fetal green fluorescent protein (GFP)transgenic pigs. Cultures were propagated from the brain, retina, and corneo-scleral limbus. GFP expression rapidly increased with time in culture, although lower in conjunction with photoreceptor markers and filial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), thus suggesting downregulation of GFP during differentiation. Following transplantation, GFP expression allowed histological visualization of integrated cells and extension of fine processes to adjacent plexiform layers. GFP expression in subretinal grafts was high in cells expressing vimentin and lower in cells expressing photoreceptor markers, again consistent with possible downregulation during differentiation. Cells survived transplantation to the injured retina of allorecipients at all time points examined (up to 10 weeks) in the absence of exogenous immune suppression without indications of rejection. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of allogeneic progenitor transplantation in a large mammal and the utility of the pig in ocular regeneration studies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cloning and Stem Cells
volume
10
issue
3
pages
391 - 402
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000259313100011
  • scopus:51349134455
ISSN
1536-2302
DOI
10.1089/clo.2008.0010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7ddb13d8-6a20-4262-9265-0e850015f187 (old id 1246710)
date added to LUP
2008-11-18 09:06:54
date last changed
2017-05-28 04:00:39
@article{7ddb13d8-6a20-4262-9265-0e850015f187,
  abstract     = {Work in rodents has demonstrated that progenitor transplantation can achieve limited photoreceptor replacement in the mammalian retina; however, replication of these findings on a clinically relevant scale requires a large animal model. To evaluate the ability of porcine retinal progenitor cells to survival as allografts and integrate into the host retinal architecture, we isolated donor cells from fetal green fluorescent protein (GFP)transgenic pigs. Cultures were propagated from the brain, retina, and corneo-scleral limbus. GFP expression rapidly increased with time in culture, although lower in conjunction with photoreceptor markers and filial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), thus suggesting downregulation of GFP during differentiation. Following transplantation, GFP expression allowed histological visualization of integrated cells and extension of fine processes to adjacent plexiform layers. GFP expression in subretinal grafts was high in cells expressing vimentin and lower in cells expressing photoreceptor markers, again consistent with possible downregulation during differentiation. Cells survived transplantation to the injured retina of allorecipients at all time points examined (up to 10 weeks) in the absence of exogenous immune suppression without indications of rejection. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of allogeneic progenitor transplantation in a large mammal and the utility of the pig in ocular regeneration studies.},
  author       = {Klassen, Henry and Warfvinge, Karin and Schwartz, Philip H. and Kiilgaard, Jens Folke and Shamie, Neda and Jiang, Caihui and Samuel, Melissa and Scherfig, Erik and Prather, Randall S. and Young, Michael J.},
  issn         = {1536-2302},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {391--402},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Cloning and Stem Cells},
  title        = {Isolation of progenitor cells from GFP-Transgenic pigs and transplantation to the retina of allorecipients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/clo.2008.0010},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2008},
}