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Predictors of successful, self-reported lifestyle changes in a defined middle-aged population: The Soderakra cardiovascular risk factor study, Sweden

Petersson, Ulla; Ostgren, Carl Johan; Brudin, Lars; Ovhed, Ingvar and Nilsson, Peter LU (2008) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 36(4). p.389-396
Abstract
Aims: It is well established that the main cause of the development of cardiovascular disease can be found in unhealthy lifestyle habits. In our study, we wanted to explore the long-term predictors of self-reported lifestyle changes in a middle-aged population after screening for cardiovascular risk factors 10 years earlier. Methods: We conducted a 10-year follow-up telephone interview on self-reported lifestyle changes in a rural population in south-eastern Sweden, after a cardiovascular screening programme. The population comprised 90% of all inhabitants (n=705) aged 40-59 years at baseline, and 90% of these (n=629) were reached for the telephone interview. Results: When multivariate logistic regression was used, a higher success rate... (More)
Aims: It is well established that the main cause of the development of cardiovascular disease can be found in unhealthy lifestyle habits. In our study, we wanted to explore the long-term predictors of self-reported lifestyle changes in a middle-aged population after screening for cardiovascular risk factors 10 years earlier. Methods: We conducted a 10-year follow-up telephone interview on self-reported lifestyle changes in a rural population in south-eastern Sweden, after a cardiovascular screening programme. The population comprised 90% of all inhabitants (n=705) aged 40-59 years at baseline, and 90% of these (n=629) were reached for the telephone interview. Results: When multivariate logistic regression was used, a higher success rate for lifestyle changes was independently associated with female gender (odds ratio (OR)=1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-2.18). When stratified for gender, significant predictors for success in men were prevalent cardiovascular risk conditions (OR=4.77, 95% CI 2.18-10.5; p<0.001) and previous myocardial infarction (OR=22.8, 95% CI 4.73-110; p<0.001) at baseline. For women, elevated blood pressure (>= 160 and/or >= 90 mmHg) measured at baseline (OR=1.84, 95% CI 1.12-3.02; p=0.016) was significantly associated with successful lifestyle changes. Smoking at baseline was also associated with significant success: OR=3.36 (95% CI: 2.05-5.51; p<0.001) and OR=1.81 (95% CI 1.11-2.95; p=0.017) for men and women, respectively. Conclusions: Female gender was associated with significant improvements in self-reported lifestyle changes. Furthermore, smoking, a medical history of diabetes, hypertension, angina pectoris or myocardial infarction at baseline predicted success in lifestyle change in this 10-year follow-up study. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
population-based, cardiovascular, lifestyle change, risk factors
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
36
issue
4
pages
389 - 396
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000257536300008
  • scopus:44849117535
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1177/1403494808089561
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
53d8f7fb-4767-4f59-98d9-28d9f1dfc27a (old id 1254000)
date added to LUP
2008-11-03 15:28:47
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:03:32
@article{53d8f7fb-4767-4f59-98d9-28d9f1dfc27a,
  abstract     = {Aims: It is well established that the main cause of the development of cardiovascular disease can be found in unhealthy lifestyle habits. In our study, we wanted to explore the long-term predictors of self-reported lifestyle changes in a middle-aged population after screening for cardiovascular risk factors 10 years earlier. Methods: We conducted a 10-year follow-up telephone interview on self-reported lifestyle changes in a rural population in south-eastern Sweden, after a cardiovascular screening programme. The population comprised 90% of all inhabitants (n=705) aged 40-59 years at baseline, and 90% of these (n=629) were reached for the telephone interview. Results: When multivariate logistic regression was used, a higher success rate for lifestyle changes was independently associated with female gender (odds ratio (OR)=1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-2.18). When stratified for gender, significant predictors for success in men were prevalent cardiovascular risk conditions (OR=4.77, 95% CI 2.18-10.5; p&lt;0.001) and previous myocardial infarction (OR=22.8, 95% CI 4.73-110; p&lt;0.001) at baseline. For women, elevated blood pressure (&gt;= 160 and/or &gt;= 90 mmHg) measured at baseline (OR=1.84, 95% CI 1.12-3.02; p=0.016) was significantly associated with successful lifestyle changes. Smoking at baseline was also associated with significant success: OR=3.36 (95% CI: 2.05-5.51; p&lt;0.001) and OR=1.81 (95% CI 1.11-2.95; p=0.017) for men and women, respectively. Conclusions: Female gender was associated with significant improvements in self-reported lifestyle changes. Furthermore, smoking, a medical history of diabetes, hypertension, angina pectoris or myocardial infarction at baseline predicted success in lifestyle change in this 10-year follow-up study.},
  author       = {Petersson, Ulla and Ostgren, Carl Johan and Brudin, Lars and Ovhed, Ingvar and Nilsson, Peter},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  keyword      = {population-based,cardiovascular,lifestyle change,risk factors},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {389--396},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Predictors of successful, self-reported lifestyle changes in a defined middle-aged population: The Soderakra cardiovascular risk factor study, Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494808089561},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2008},
}