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Lifespan and mortality of old oaks - combining empirical and modelling approaches to support their management in Southern Sweden

Drobyshev, Igor; Niklasson, Mats; Linderson, Hans LU ; Sonesson, Kerstin; Karlsson, Matts; Nilsson, Sven LU and Lanner, Jan (2008) In Annals of Forest Science 65(4). p.401-401
Abstract
Old oaks (Quercus robur L.) play an important role in the southern Scandinavian landscape by providing habitat for a wide range of species, a large proportion of them being currently on the National Redlists. To provide support for the management of these trees, we review data on oak mortality and formulate a mortality-driven stochastic model analysing interactions between mortality rate, oak recruitment rate into 100-150 age class, and amount of oaks older than 200 years. Empirical annual mortality rates varied between 0 and 13% with average 1.68%. Trees older 200 years had an average mortality rate of 1.1%. Oaks in the high density forests showed higher mortality (3.2%) as compared to the trees growing in the low density forests (1.2%).... (More)
Old oaks (Quercus robur L.) play an important role in the southern Scandinavian landscape by providing habitat for a wide range of species, a large proportion of them being currently on the National Redlists. To provide support for the management of these trees, we review data on oak mortality and formulate a mortality-driven stochastic model analysing interactions between mortality rate, oak recruitment rate into 100-150 age class, and amount of oaks older than 200 years. Empirical annual mortality rates varied between 0 and 13% with average 1.68%. Trees older 200 years had an average mortality rate of 1.1%. Oaks in the high density forests showed higher mortality (3.2%) as compared to the trees growing in the low density forests (1.2%). A 400-year long modelling exercises indicated that under current mortality rates (regular mortality being centred around 1% annually; and irregular mortality 7% with average return time of 13 years) the long-term maintenance of 20 trees older than 200 years per ha would require an input rate of 1 to 5 trees x year(-1) x ha(-1) into the 100-150 years old class. The modelling highlighted the importance of initial oak abundance affecting amount of old trees at the end of shorter (100 years) simulation period. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
disturbance, dynamics, population, dendrochronology, European hardwoods, conservation
in
Annals of Forest Science
volume
65
issue
4
pages
401 - 401
publisher
EDP Sciences
external identifiers
  • wos:000257337100001
  • scopus:44849137133
ISSN
1286-4560
DOI
10.1051/forest:2008012
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9ee3227a-04bd-4215-9c00-ea7d121861d4 (old id 1257184)
date added to LUP
2008-10-14 15:48:22
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:27:06
@article{9ee3227a-04bd-4215-9c00-ea7d121861d4,
  abstract     = {Old oaks (Quercus robur L.) play an important role in the southern Scandinavian landscape by providing habitat for a wide range of species, a large proportion of them being currently on the National Redlists. To provide support for the management of these trees, we review data on oak mortality and formulate a mortality-driven stochastic model analysing interactions between mortality rate, oak recruitment rate into 100-150 age class, and amount of oaks older than 200 years. Empirical annual mortality rates varied between 0 and 13% with average 1.68%. Trees older 200 years had an average mortality rate of 1.1%. Oaks in the high density forests showed higher mortality (3.2%) as compared to the trees growing in the low density forests (1.2%). A 400-year long modelling exercises indicated that under current mortality rates (regular mortality being centred around 1% annually; and irregular mortality 7% with average return time of 13 years) the long-term maintenance of 20 trees older than 200 years per ha would require an input rate of 1 to 5 trees x year(-1) x ha(-1) into the 100-150 years old class. The modelling highlighted the importance of initial oak abundance affecting amount of old trees at the end of shorter (100 years) simulation period.},
  author       = {Drobyshev, Igor and Niklasson, Mats and Linderson, Hans and Sonesson, Kerstin and Karlsson, Matts and Nilsson, Sven and Lanner, Jan},
  issn         = {1286-4560},
  keyword      = {disturbance,dynamics,population,dendrochronology,European hardwoods,conservation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {401--401},
  publisher    = {EDP Sciences},
  series       = {Annals of Forest Science},
  title        = {Lifespan and mortality of old oaks - combining empirical and modelling approaches to support their management in Southern Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/forest:2008012},
  volume       = {65},
  year         = {2008},
}