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Bone cement X-ray contrast media: A clinically relevant method of measuring their efficacy.

Kjellson, Fred LU ; Almén, Torsten LU ; Tanner, K E; McCarthy, Ian LU and Lidgren, Lars LU (2004) In Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied Biomaterials 70B(2). p.354-361
Abstract
It is important to compare different contrast media used in bone cement according to their ability to attenuate X-rays and thereby produce image contrast between bone cement and its surroundings in clinical applications. The radiopacity of bone cement is often evaluated by making radiographs of cement in air at an X-ray tube voltage of 40 kV. We have developed a method for ranking contrast media in bone cement simulating the clinical situation, by (1) choosing the same X-ray tube voltage as used in clinical work, and (2) using a water phantom to imitate the effects of the patients' soft tissue on the X-ray photons. In clinical work it is desirable to have low radiation dose, but high image contrast. The voltage chosen is a compromise,... (More)
It is important to compare different contrast media used in bone cement according to their ability to attenuate X-rays and thereby produce image contrast between bone cement and its surroundings in clinical applications. The radiopacity of bone cement is often evaluated by making radiographs of cement in air at an X-ray tube voltage of 40 kV. We have developed a method for ranking contrast media in bone cement simulating the clinical situation, by (1) choosing the same X-ray tube voltage as used in clinical work, and (2) using a water phantom to imitate the effects of the patients' soft tissue on the X-ray photons. In clinical work it is desirable to have low radiation dose, but high image contrast. The voltage chosen is a compromise, because both dose and image contrast decrease with higher voltage. Three contrast media (ZrO2, BaSO4, and Iodixanol) have been compared for degree of "image contrast." Comparing 10 wt % contrast media samples at an X-ray tube voltage of 40 kV, ZrO2 produced higher image contrast than the other media. However, at 80 kV, using a water phantom, the results were reversed, ZrO2 produced lower image contrast than both BaSO4 and Iodixanol. We conclude that evaluations of contrast media should be made with voltages and phantoms imitating the clinical application. (C) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
contrast media, measurement technique, radiography, bone cement
in
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied Biomaterials
volume
70B
issue
2
pages
354 - 361
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:15264319
  • wos:000222949700023
  • scopus:3442896181
ISSN
1552-4981
DOI
10.1002/jbm.b.30060
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c5728275-eceb-47e7-83e6-fc6f767ef670 (old id 125760)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15264319&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-03 13:42:54
date last changed
2017-08-20 03:36:18
@article{c5728275-eceb-47e7-83e6-fc6f767ef670,
  abstract     = {It is important to compare different contrast media used in bone cement according to their ability to attenuate X-rays and thereby produce image contrast between bone cement and its surroundings in clinical applications. The radiopacity of bone cement is often evaluated by making radiographs of cement in air at an X-ray tube voltage of 40 kV. We have developed a method for ranking contrast media in bone cement simulating the clinical situation, by (1) choosing the same X-ray tube voltage as used in clinical work, and (2) using a water phantom to imitate the effects of the patients' soft tissue on the X-ray photons. In clinical work it is desirable to have low radiation dose, but high image contrast. The voltage chosen is a compromise, because both dose and image contrast decrease with higher voltage. Three contrast media (ZrO2, BaSO4, and Iodixanol) have been compared for degree of "image contrast." Comparing 10 wt % contrast media samples at an X-ray tube voltage of 40 kV, ZrO2 produced higher image contrast than the other media. However, at 80 kV, using a water phantom, the results were reversed, ZrO2 produced lower image contrast than both BaSO4 and Iodixanol. We conclude that evaluations of contrast media should be made with voltages and phantoms imitating the clinical application. (C) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.},
  author       = {Kjellson, Fred and Almén, Torsten and Tanner, K E and McCarthy, Ian and Lidgren, Lars},
  issn         = {1552-4981},
  keyword      = {contrast media,measurement technique,radiography,bone cement},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {354--361},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied Biomaterials},
  title        = {Bone cement X-ray contrast media: A clinically relevant method of measuring their efficacy.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.30060},
  volume       = {70B},
  year         = {2004},
}