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Experiences of alcohol and other drugs in individuals with severe mental illness and concomitant substance use disorders

Cruce, Gunilla LU ; Öjehagen, Agneta LU and Nordström, Monica (2008) In Mental Health and Substance Use 1(3). p.228-241
Abstract
Background: It is well known that severe mental illness (SMI) with concurrent substance use disorders (SUD) commonly occurs. This comorbidity has distressing social, psychological, psychiatric and somatic consequences.

Aim: To gain greater understanding of how individuals with SMI and SUD experience the roles of alcohol and other drugs for their health and in their life situation.

Method: Eight individuals were interviewed on two occasions. The semi-structured interviews, which were based on an interview guide, were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically.

Results: Alcohol and drug use influenced the individuals’ own experiences of their health and life situation both in a positive and negative way.... (More)
Background: It is well known that severe mental illness (SMI) with concurrent substance use disorders (SUD) commonly occurs. This comorbidity has distressing social, psychological, psychiatric and somatic consequences.

Aim: To gain greater understanding of how individuals with SMI and SUD experience the roles of alcohol and other drugs for their health and in their life situation.

Method: Eight individuals were interviewed on two occasions. The semi-structured interviews, which were based on an interview guide, were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically.

Results: Alcohol and drug use influenced the individuals’ own experiences of their health and life situation both in a positive and negative way. Substance use had meaning for their

1) experience of themselves – well-being and discomfort, energy and lack of energy, meaningfulness and disorientation, identity and personality change; 2) experiences of relationships – affiliation and alienation; 3) experiences of mental health – decreased and increased symptom levels.

Conclusions: When providing treatment and support it seems important to be aware of a person’s own motives for using alcohol and drugs. From the individuals’ point of view their misuse appeared as a reasonable, but misguided effort to obtain control over his/her health and life situation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
substance use disorders, client experiences, dual diagnosis, in-depth interviews, severe mental illness, qualitative research
in
Mental Health and Substance Use
volume
1
issue
3
pages
228 - 241
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:84868104325
ISSN
1752-3281
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2281dd96-c522-4511-96f8-6a945013b11f (old id 1259862)
alternative location
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17523280802317404#.UgTi9n_X9r4
date added to LUP
2013-08-09 14:40:07
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:41:56
@article{2281dd96-c522-4511-96f8-6a945013b11f,
  abstract     = {Background: It is well known that severe mental illness (SMI) with concurrent substance use disorders (SUD) commonly occurs. This comorbidity has distressing social, psychological, psychiatric and somatic consequences.<br/><br>
Aim: To gain greater understanding of how individuals with SMI and SUD experience the roles of alcohol and other drugs for their health and in their life situation.<br/><br>
Method: Eight individuals were interviewed on two occasions. The semi-structured interviews, which were based on an interview guide, were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically.<br/><br>
Results: Alcohol and drug use influenced the individuals’ own experiences of their health and life situation both in a positive and negative way. Substance use had meaning for their <br/><br>
1) experience of themselves – well-being and discomfort, energy and lack of energy, meaningfulness and disorientation, identity and personality change; 2) experiences of relationships – affiliation and alienation; 3) experiences of mental health – decreased and increased symptom levels.<br/><br>
Conclusions: When providing treatment and support it seems important to be aware of a person’s own motives for using alcohol and drugs. From the individuals’ point of view their misuse appeared as a reasonable, but misguided effort to obtain control over his/her health and life situation.},
  author       = {Cruce, Gunilla and Öjehagen, Agneta and Nordström, Monica},
  issn         = {1752-3281},
  keyword      = {substance use disorders,client experiences,dual diagnosis,in-depth interviews,severe mental illness,qualitative research},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {228--241},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Mental Health and Substance Use},
  title        = {Experiences of alcohol and other drugs in individuals with severe mental illness and concomitant substance use disorders},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2008},
}