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Decomposing health: tolerance and resistance to parasites in animals.

Råberg, Lars LU ; Graham, Andrea L and Read, Andrew F (2009) In Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 364(1513). p.37-49
Abstract
Plant biologists have long recognized that host defence against parasites and pathogens can be divided into two conceptually different components: the ability to limit parasite burden (resistance) and the ability to limit the harm caused by a given burden (tolerance). Together these two components determine how well a host is protected against the effects of parasitism. This distinction is useful because it recognizes that hosts that are best at controlling parasite burdens are not necessarily the healthiest. Moreover, resistance and tolerance can be expected to have different effects on the epidemiology of infectious diseases and host-parasite coevolution. However, studies of defence in animals have to date focused on resistance, whereas... (More)
Plant biologists have long recognized that host defence against parasites and pathogens can be divided into two conceptually different components: the ability to limit parasite burden (resistance) and the ability to limit the harm caused by a given burden (tolerance). Together these two components determine how well a host is protected against the effects of parasitism. This distinction is useful because it recognizes that hosts that are best at controlling parasite burdens are not necessarily the healthiest. Moreover, resistance and tolerance can be expected to have different effects on the epidemiology of infectious diseases and host-parasite coevolution. However, studies of defence in animals have to date focused on resistance, whereas the possibility of tolerance and its implications have been largely overlooked. The aim of our review is to (i) describe the statistical framework for analysis of tolerance developed in plant science and how this can be applied to animals, (ii) review evidence of genetic and environmental variation for tolerance in animals, and studies indicating which mechanisms could contribute to this variation, and (iii) outline avenues for future research on this topic. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
tolerance, virulence, infectious disease, resistance, immunopathology
in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
volume
364
issue
1513
pages
37 - 49
publisher
Royal Society Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000261150600004
  • scopus:58149153179
  • pmid:18926971
ISSN
1471-2970
DOI
10.1098/rstb.2008.0184
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d8fbe01d-6497-488f-a581-a590ecf31af4 (old id 1262162)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 13:53:21
date last changed
2021-10-06 04:14:38
@article{d8fbe01d-6497-488f-a581-a590ecf31af4,
  abstract     = {Plant biologists have long recognized that host defence against parasites and pathogens can be divided into two conceptually different components: the ability to limit parasite burden (resistance) and the ability to limit the harm caused by a given burden (tolerance). Together these two components determine how well a host is protected against the effects of parasitism. This distinction is useful because it recognizes that hosts that are best at controlling parasite burdens are not necessarily the healthiest. Moreover, resistance and tolerance can be expected to have different effects on the epidemiology of infectious diseases and host-parasite coevolution. However, studies of defence in animals have to date focused on resistance, whereas the possibility of tolerance and its implications have been largely overlooked. The aim of our review is to (i) describe the statistical framework for analysis of tolerance developed in plant science and how this can be applied to animals, (ii) review evidence of genetic and environmental variation for tolerance in animals, and studies indicating which mechanisms could contribute to this variation, and (iii) outline avenues for future research on this topic.},
  author       = {Råberg, Lars and Graham, Andrea L and Read, Andrew F},
  issn         = {1471-2970},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1513},
  pages        = {37--49},
  publisher    = {Royal Society Publishing},
  series       = {Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  title        = {Decomposing health: tolerance and resistance to parasites in animals.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2008.0184},
  doi          = {10.1098/rstb.2008.0184},
  volume       = {364},
  year         = {2009},
}