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Antioxidant metabolism induced by quinic acid. increased urinary excretion of tryptophan and nicotinamide.

Pero, Ronald W; Lund, Harald LU and Leanderson, Tomas LU (2009) In Phytotherapy Research Oct 9. p.335-346
Abstract
For over 50 years, hippuric/quinic acids were believed to have no biological efficacy. Here data are presented to support the hypothesis that quinic acid is not responsible for any efficacy, but rather that quinic acid nutritionally supports the synthesis of tryptophan and nicotinamide in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and that this in turn leads to DNA repair enhancement and NF-kB inhibition via increased nicotinamide and tryptophan production.Moreover, it is shown that quinic acid is a normal constituent of our diet, capable of conversion to tryptophan and nicotinamide via the GI tract microflora, thus providing an in situ physiological source of these essential metabolic ingredients to humans. The concentrations of quinic and hippuric... (More)
For over 50 years, hippuric/quinic acids were believed to have no biological efficacy. Here data are presented to support the hypothesis that quinic acid is not responsible for any efficacy, but rather that quinic acid nutritionally supports the synthesis of tryptophan and nicotinamide in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and that this in turn leads to DNA repair enhancement and NF-kB inhibition via increased nicotinamide and tryptophan production.Moreover, it is shown that quinic acid is a normal constituent of our diet, capable of conversion to tryptophan and nicotinamide via the GI tract microflora, thus providing an in situ physiological source of these essential metabolic ingredients to humans. The concentrations of quinic and hippuric acids in the diet were dependent on each other when analysed in urine, as was evidenced by a significant linear regression analysis that included unsupplemented control subjects (n = 45, p < 0.001). Thus, these ingredients were identified as major dietary components, and not simply originating from environmental pollution as previously had been thought. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Phytotherapy Research
volume
Oct 9
pages
335 - 346
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000264230800007
  • pmid:18844285
  • scopus:61449154423
ISSN
1099-1573
DOI
10.1002/ptr.2628
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5f8da15c-585e-45cb-8a81-0f9490073bf2 (old id 1262410)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18844285?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-11-10 16:33:45
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:37:44
@article{5f8da15c-585e-45cb-8a81-0f9490073bf2,
  abstract     = {For over 50 years, hippuric/quinic acids were believed to have no biological efficacy. Here data are presented to support the hypothesis that quinic acid is not responsible for any efficacy, but rather that quinic acid nutritionally supports the synthesis of tryptophan and nicotinamide in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and that this in turn leads to DNA repair enhancement and NF-kB inhibition via increased nicotinamide and tryptophan production.Moreover, it is shown that quinic acid is a normal constituent of our diet, capable of conversion to tryptophan and nicotinamide via the GI tract microflora, thus providing an in situ physiological source of these essential metabolic ingredients to humans. The concentrations of quinic and hippuric acids in the diet were dependent on each other when analysed in urine, as was evidenced by a significant linear regression analysis that included unsupplemented control subjects (n = 45, p &lt; 0.001). Thus, these ingredients were identified as major dietary components, and not simply originating from environmental pollution as previously had been thought. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd.},
  author       = {Pero, Ronald W and Lund, Harald and Leanderson, Tomas},
  issn         = {1099-1573},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {335--346},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Phytotherapy Research},
  title        = {Antioxidant metabolism induced by quinic acid. increased urinary excretion of tryptophan and nicotinamide.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.2628},
  volume       = {Oct 9},
  year         = {2009},
}