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T-cell recruitment to the intestinal mucosa.

Agace, William LU (2008) In Trends in Immunology Oct 4.. p.514-522
Abstract
The intestinal epithelium and underlying lamina propria contains large numbers of T cells that play an important role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and defense against intestinal pathogens. Recent years have seen several significant advances in our understanding of the mechanisms regulating T-cell localization to the intestinal mucosa. For instance, we now know that the small intestine 'imprints' gut homing properties on T cells by inducing the expression of specific integrins and chemokine receptors. Further studies have identified distinct subsets of intestinal dendritic cells that use retinoic acid to generate both gut-tropic and regulatory T cells. As our understanding of the mechanisms regulating the generation of gut tropic... (More)
The intestinal epithelium and underlying lamina propria contains large numbers of T cells that play an important role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and defense against intestinal pathogens. Recent years have seen several significant advances in our understanding of the mechanisms regulating T-cell localization to the intestinal mucosa. For instance, we now know that the small intestine 'imprints' gut homing properties on T cells by inducing the expression of specific integrins and chemokine receptors. Further studies have identified distinct subsets of intestinal dendritic cells that use retinoic acid to generate both gut-tropic and regulatory T cells. As our understanding of the mechanisms regulating the generation of gut tropic T-cell populations evolves, the possibility of targeting these processes for mucosal vaccine development and treatment of intestinal immune pathology become more apparent. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Trends in Immunology
volume
Oct 4.
pages
514 - 522
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000261044900003
  • pmid:18838302
  • scopus:53849098346
ISSN
1471-4981
DOI
10.1016/j.it.2008.08.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4e7fb4e4-2425-4059-b2a5-1813aa400d49 (old id 1262560)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18838302?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-11-06 15:22:53
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:45:03
@article{4e7fb4e4-2425-4059-b2a5-1813aa400d49,
  abstract     = {The intestinal epithelium and underlying lamina propria contains large numbers of T cells that play an important role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and defense against intestinal pathogens. Recent years have seen several significant advances in our understanding of the mechanisms regulating T-cell localization to the intestinal mucosa. For instance, we now know that the small intestine 'imprints' gut homing properties on T cells by inducing the expression of specific integrins and chemokine receptors. Further studies have identified distinct subsets of intestinal dendritic cells that use retinoic acid to generate both gut-tropic and regulatory T cells. As our understanding of the mechanisms regulating the generation of gut tropic T-cell populations evolves, the possibility of targeting these processes for mucosal vaccine development and treatment of intestinal immune pathology become more apparent.},
  author       = {Agace, William},
  issn         = {1471-4981},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {514--522},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Trends in Immunology},
  title        = {T-cell recruitment to the intestinal mucosa.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.it.2008.08.003},
  volume       = {Oct 4.},
  year         = {2008},
}