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The role of Caveolin-1 in cardiovascular regulation.

Rahman, Awahan and Swärd, Karl LU (2009) In Acta Physiologica2006-01-01+01:002013-01-01+01:00 Sep 25. p.231-245
Abstract
Abstract Caveolae are omega-shaped membrane invaginations present in essentially all cell types in the cardiovascular system, and numerous functions have been ascribed to these structures. Caveolae formation depends on caveolins, cholesterol, and PTRF-Cavin (polymerase I and transcript release factor-Cavin). The current review summarizes and critically discusses the cardiovascular phenotypes reported in caveolin-1-deficient mice. Major changes in the structure and function of heart, lung, and blood vessels have been documented, suggesting that caveolae play a critical role at the interface between blood and surrounding tissue. According to an emerging paradigm many of these changes are secondary to uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide... (More)
Abstract Caveolae are omega-shaped membrane invaginations present in essentially all cell types in the cardiovascular system, and numerous functions have been ascribed to these structures. Caveolae formation depends on caveolins, cholesterol, and PTRF-Cavin (polymerase I and transcript release factor-Cavin). The current review summarizes and critically discusses the cardiovascular phenotypes reported in caveolin-1-deficient mice. Major changes in the structure and function of heart, lung, and blood vessels have been documented, suggesting that caveolae play a critical role at the interface between blood and surrounding tissue. According to an emerging paradigm many of these changes are secondary to uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Thus, nitric oxide synthase not only synthesizes more nitric oxide in the absence of caveolin-1, but also more superoxide with potential pathogenic consequences. It is further argued that the vasodilating drive from increased nitric oxide production in caveolin-1-deficient mice is balanced by changes in the vascular media that favour increased dynamic resistance regulation. Harnessing the therapeutic opportunities buried in caveolae, while challenging, could expand the arsenal of treatment options in cancer, lung disease, and atherosclerosis. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Physiologica2006-01-01+01:002013-01-01+01:00
volume
Sep 25
pages
231 - 245
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000262222700004
  • pmid:18826501
  • scopus:58149232354
ISSN
1748-1708
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-1716.2008.01907.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8b811612-2291-41b7-bd0b-de079bcfb7d3 (old id 1262668)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18826501?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-11-06 15:19:25
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:41:13
@article{8b811612-2291-41b7-bd0b-de079bcfb7d3,
  abstract     = {Abstract Caveolae are omega-shaped membrane invaginations present in essentially all cell types in the cardiovascular system, and numerous functions have been ascribed to these structures. Caveolae formation depends on caveolins, cholesterol, and PTRF-Cavin (polymerase I and transcript release factor-Cavin). The current review summarizes and critically discusses the cardiovascular phenotypes reported in caveolin-1-deficient mice. Major changes in the structure and function of heart, lung, and blood vessels have been documented, suggesting that caveolae play a critical role at the interface between blood and surrounding tissue. According to an emerging paradigm many of these changes are secondary to uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Thus, nitric oxide synthase not only synthesizes more nitric oxide in the absence of caveolin-1, but also more superoxide with potential pathogenic consequences. It is further argued that the vasodilating drive from increased nitric oxide production in caveolin-1-deficient mice is balanced by changes in the vascular media that favour increased dynamic resistance regulation. Harnessing the therapeutic opportunities buried in caveolae, while challenging, could expand the arsenal of treatment options in cancer, lung disease, and atherosclerosis.},
  author       = {Rahman, Awahan and Swärd, Karl},
  issn         = {1748-1708},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {231--245},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Physiologica2006-01-01+01:002013-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {The role of Caveolin-1 in cardiovascular regulation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-1716.2008.01907.x},
  volume       = {Sep 25},
  year         = {2009},
}