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Repeated apneas do not affect the hypercapnic ventilatory response in the short term.

Andersson, Johan LU orcid and Schagatay, Erika (2009) In European Journal of Applied Physiology 105(4). p.569-574
Abstract
Long-term training of breath-hold diving reduces the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR), an index of the CO(2) sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether also short-term apnea training (repeating apneas with short intervals) reduces the HCVR, thereby being one contributing factor explaining the progressively increasing breath-holding time (BHT) with repetition of apneas. Fourteen healthy volunteers performed a series of five maximal-duration apneas with face immersion and two measurements of the HCVR, using the Read rebreathing method. The BHT increased by 43% during the series of apneas (P < 0.001). However, the slope of the HCVR test was not affected by the series of apneas, being 2.52 (SD 1.27) and 2.24... (More)
Long-term training of breath-hold diving reduces the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR), an index of the CO(2) sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether also short-term apnea training (repeating apneas with short intervals) reduces the HCVR, thereby being one contributing factor explaining the progressively increasing breath-holding time (BHT) with repetition of apneas. Fourteen healthy volunteers performed a series of five maximal-duration apneas with face immersion and two measurements of the HCVR, using the Read rebreathing method. The BHT increased by 43% during the series of apneas (P < 0.001). However, the slope of the HCVR test was not affected by the series of apneas, being 2.52 (SD 1.27) and 2.24 (SD 1.14) l min(-1) mmHg(-1) in the control test and in the test performed within 2 min after the last apnea of the series, respectively (NS). Thus, a change in the HCVR cannot explain the observed short-term training effect on BHT. (Less)
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author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Applied Physiology
volume
105
issue
4
pages
569 - 574
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000262826200008
  • scopus:59449098782
  • pmid:19018556
ISSN
1439-6327
DOI
10.1007/s00421-008-0936-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8bbcf98f-cb06-4640-bacd-1ba7f25093a4 (old id 1271338)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:24:58
date last changed
2021-05-05 03:54:28
@article{8bbcf98f-cb06-4640-bacd-1ba7f25093a4,
  abstract     = {Long-term training of breath-hold diving reduces the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR), an index of the CO(2) sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether also short-term apnea training (repeating apneas with short intervals) reduces the HCVR, thereby being one contributing factor explaining the progressively increasing breath-holding time (BHT) with repetition of apneas. Fourteen healthy volunteers performed a series of five maximal-duration apneas with face immersion and two measurements of the HCVR, using the Read rebreathing method. The BHT increased by 43% during the series of apneas (P &lt; 0.001). However, the slope of the HCVR test was not affected by the series of apneas, being 2.52 (SD 1.27) and 2.24 (SD 1.14) l min(-1) mmHg(-1) in the control test and in the test performed within 2 min after the last apnea of the series, respectively (NS). Thus, a change in the HCVR cannot explain the observed short-term training effect on BHT.},
  author       = {Andersson, Johan and Schagatay, Erika},
  issn         = {1439-6327},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {569--574},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Applied Physiology},
  title        = {Repeated apneas do not affect the hypercapnic ventilatory response in the short term.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-008-0936-y},
  doi          = {10.1007/s00421-008-0936-y},
  volume       = {105},
  year         = {2009},
}