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Sleeping problems as a risk factor for subsequent musculoskeletal pain and the role of job strain: results from a one-year follow-up of the Malmö Shoulder Neck Study Cohort.

Canivet, Catarina LU ; Östergren, Per-Olof LU ; Choi, Bongkyoo; Nilsson, Peter LU ; af Sillén, Ulrika LU ; Moghadassi, Mahnaz; Karasek, Robert and Isacsson, Sven-Olof LU (2008) In International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 15(4). p.254-262
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The role of sleeping problems in the causal pathway between job strain and musculoskeletal pain is not clear. Purpose: To investigate the impact of sleeping problems and job strain on the one-year risk for neck, shoulder, and lumbar pain. METHOD: A prospective study, using self-administered questionnaires, of a healthy cohort of 4,140 vocationally active persons ages 45-64, residing in the city of Malmo. RESULTS: At follow-up, 11.8% of the men and 14.8% of the women had developed pain. The odds ratios (OR) for pain at follow-up and sleeping problems at baseline were 1.72 (95% CI: 1.13-2.61) in men and 1.91 (1.35-2.70) in women. Regarding exposure to job strain, ORs were 1.39 (0.94-2.05) for men and 1.63 (1.18-2.23) for women.... (More)
BACKGROUND: The role of sleeping problems in the causal pathway between job strain and musculoskeletal pain is not clear. Purpose: To investigate the impact of sleeping problems and job strain on the one-year risk for neck, shoulder, and lumbar pain. METHOD: A prospective study, using self-administered questionnaires, of a healthy cohort of 4,140 vocationally active persons ages 45-64, residing in the city of Malmo. RESULTS: At follow-up, 11.8% of the men and 14.8% of the women had developed pain. The odds ratios (OR) for pain at follow-up and sleeping problems at baseline were 1.72 (95% CI: 1.13-2.61) in men and 1.91 (1.35-2.70) in women. Regarding exposure to job strain, ORs were 1.39 (0.94-2.05) for men and 1.63 (1.18-2.23) for women. These statistically significant risks remained so when controlled for possible confounding. A modest synergistic effect was noted in women with concurrent sleeping problems and job strain, but not in men. CONCLUSION: One in 15-20 of all new cases of chronic pain in the population could be attributed to sleeping problems. No evidence was found for a causal chain with job strain leading to musculoskeletal pain by the pathway of sleeping problems. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
volume
15
issue
4
pages
254 - 262
publisher
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates
external identifiers
  • wos:000260852000002
  • pmid:19005925
  • scopus:56249135573
ISSN
1070-5503
DOI
10.1080/10705500802365466
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e387c586-ac13-4caf-ab80-8e342fa26174 (old id 1271508)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19005925?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-12-04 14:36:04
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:51:55
@article{e387c586-ac13-4caf-ab80-8e342fa26174,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The role of sleeping problems in the causal pathway between job strain and musculoskeletal pain is not clear. Purpose: To investigate the impact of sleeping problems and job strain on the one-year risk for neck, shoulder, and lumbar pain. METHOD: A prospective study, using self-administered questionnaires, of a healthy cohort of 4,140 vocationally active persons ages 45-64, residing in the city of Malmo. RESULTS: At follow-up, 11.8% of the men and 14.8% of the women had developed pain. The odds ratios (OR) for pain at follow-up and sleeping problems at baseline were 1.72 (95% CI: 1.13-2.61) in men and 1.91 (1.35-2.70) in women. Regarding exposure to job strain, ORs were 1.39 (0.94-2.05) for men and 1.63 (1.18-2.23) for women. These statistically significant risks remained so when controlled for possible confounding. A modest synergistic effect was noted in women with concurrent sleeping problems and job strain, but not in men. CONCLUSION: One in 15-20 of all new cases of chronic pain in the population could be attributed to sleeping problems. No evidence was found for a causal chain with job strain leading to musculoskeletal pain by the pathway of sleeping problems.},
  author       = {Canivet, Catarina and Östergren, Per-Olof and Choi, Bongkyoo and Nilsson, Peter and af Sillén, Ulrika and Moghadassi, Mahnaz and Karasek, Robert and Isacsson, Sven-Olof},
  issn         = {1070-5503},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {254--262},
  publisher    = {Lawrence Erlbaum Associates},
  series       = {International Journal of Behavioral Medicine},
  title        = {Sleeping problems as a risk factor for subsequent musculoskeletal pain and the role of job strain: results from a one-year follow-up of the Malmö Shoulder Neck Study Cohort.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10705500802365466},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2008},
}