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Group antenatal care: new pedagogic method for antenatal care-a pilot study.

Wedin, Kathe; Molin, Johan LU and Crang Svalenius, Elizabeth LU (2010) In Midwifery 26. p.389-393
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: to investigate how women who attended group antenatal care experienced the information they received, compared with women who attended traditional antenatal care, and their satisfaction with the form of care. The aim was also to determine the effect of group antenatal care on women's social networks compared with traditional antenatal care. DESIGN AND SETTING: a pilot study with an intervention group (group antenatal care) and a control group (traditional antenatal care). Both groups were selected through informed choice. A questionnaire and a follow-up telephone call, using a structured questionnaire, were used to evaluate both groups. PARTICIPANTS: for each woman who had chosen to be in the intervention group, two women who... (More)
OBJECTIVE: to investigate how women who attended group antenatal care experienced the information they received, compared with women who attended traditional antenatal care, and their satisfaction with the form of care. The aim was also to determine the effect of group antenatal care on women's social networks compared with traditional antenatal care. DESIGN AND SETTING: a pilot study with an intervention group (group antenatal care) and a control group (traditional antenatal care). Both groups were selected through informed choice. A questionnaire and a follow-up telephone call, using a structured questionnaire, were used to evaluate both groups. PARTICIPANTS: for each woman who had chosen to be in the intervention group, two women who had chosen traditional antenatal care were selected from the same antenatal clinic and given the same questionnaire. FINDINGS: 35/45 (77%) women in the intervention group returned a completed questionnaire, compared with 40/85 (48%) women in the control group. There was little difference in satisfaction with information between the two groups, and overall satisfaction was high. KEY CONCLUSIONS: at six months post partum, the women who attended group antenatal care still met others from the group more regularly than the women who attended traditional antenatal care. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: group antenatal care is well accepted by women, and can better utilise midwives' time. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Midwifery
volume
26
pages
389 - 393
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000279742400003
  • pmid:19108938
  • scopus:77954620565
ISSN
1532-3099
DOI
10.1016/j.midw.2008.10.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3dba0250-00f4-4ecd-9318-266f903a8f74 (old id 1275933)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19108938?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-01-09 14:27:40
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:36:34
@article{3dba0250-00f4-4ecd-9318-266f903a8f74,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: to investigate how women who attended group antenatal care experienced the information they received, compared with women who attended traditional antenatal care, and their satisfaction with the form of care. The aim was also to determine the effect of group antenatal care on women's social networks compared with traditional antenatal care. DESIGN AND SETTING: a pilot study with an intervention group (group antenatal care) and a control group (traditional antenatal care). Both groups were selected through informed choice. A questionnaire and a follow-up telephone call, using a structured questionnaire, were used to evaluate both groups. PARTICIPANTS: for each woman who had chosen to be in the intervention group, two women who had chosen traditional antenatal care were selected from the same antenatal clinic and given the same questionnaire. FINDINGS: 35/45 (77%) women in the intervention group returned a completed questionnaire, compared with 40/85 (48%) women in the control group. There was little difference in satisfaction with information between the two groups, and overall satisfaction was high. KEY CONCLUSIONS: at six months post partum, the women who attended group antenatal care still met others from the group more regularly than the women who attended traditional antenatal care. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: group antenatal care is well accepted by women, and can better utilise midwives' time.},
  author       = {Wedin, Kathe and Molin, Johan and Crang Svalenius, Elizabeth},
  issn         = {1532-3099},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {389--393},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Midwifery},
  title        = {Group antenatal care: new pedagogic method for antenatal care-a pilot study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2008.10.010},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2010},
}