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Factors influencing the compressive strength of an injectable calcium sulfate-hydroxyapatite cement.

Nilsson, Malin K LU ; Wielanek, L; Wang, Jian-Sheng LU ; Tanner, K E and Lidgren, Lars LU (2003) In Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine 14(5). p.399-404
Abstract
A biphasic injectable bone substitute, suitable for filling bone defects, that sets in the body, based on calcium sulfate and hydroxyapatite (HA), is presented. For applications in bone defects the compressive strength is important to assure support of the defect site during loading when the patient is weight bearing. To control the strength, the influence of four different factors; the liquid-to-powder (L/P) ratio, the HA particle morphology, the HA content and the amount of accelerator, were investigated. alpha-Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) and four different HA powders (three sintered and one spray-dried) were used. All differed in size and morphology. CSH and each HA powder were mixed together with distilled water to form the bone... (More)
A biphasic injectable bone substitute, suitable for filling bone defects, that sets in the body, based on calcium sulfate and hydroxyapatite (HA), is presented. For applications in bone defects the compressive strength is important to assure support of the defect site during loading when the patient is weight bearing. To control the strength, the influence of four different factors; the liquid-to-powder (L/P) ratio, the HA particle morphology, the HA content and the amount of accelerator, were investigated. alpha-Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) and four different HA powders (three sintered and one spray-dried) were used. All differed in size and morphology. CSH and each HA powder were mixed together with distilled water to form the bone substitute. An accelerator, in form of calcium sulfate dihydrate, was added to the powder phase to obtain an adequate setting time. Cylindrical specimens were compression tested. A lower L/P-ratio gave stronger cement, but was more difficult to inject. The shape and the morphology of the HA particles influenced the strength, and reducing the amount of HA increased the strength. The amount of accelerator (calcium sulfate dihydrate) had no influence. (C) 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine
volume
14
issue
5
pages
399 - 404
publisher
Kluwer
external identifiers
  • wos:000182098700002
  • scopus:0038695017
ISSN
1573-4838
DOI
10.1023/A:1023254632704
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
047bf8db-6a86-4d63-a2d5-e631d36e32b7 (old id 127605)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15348442&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-03 16:45:49
date last changed
2017-07-23 04:36:05
@article{047bf8db-6a86-4d63-a2d5-e631d36e32b7,
  abstract     = {A biphasic injectable bone substitute, suitable for filling bone defects, that sets in the body, based on calcium sulfate and hydroxyapatite (HA), is presented. For applications in bone defects the compressive strength is important to assure support of the defect site during loading when the patient is weight bearing. To control the strength, the influence of four different factors; the liquid-to-powder (L/P) ratio, the HA particle morphology, the HA content and the amount of accelerator, were investigated. alpha-Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) and four different HA powders (three sintered and one spray-dried) were used. All differed in size and morphology. CSH and each HA powder were mixed together with distilled water to form the bone substitute. An accelerator, in form of calcium sulfate dihydrate, was added to the powder phase to obtain an adequate setting time. Cylindrical specimens were compression tested. A lower L/P-ratio gave stronger cement, but was more difficult to inject. The shape and the morphology of the HA particles influenced the strength, and reducing the amount of HA increased the strength. The amount of accelerator (calcium sulfate dihydrate) had no influence. (C) 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Malin K and Wielanek, L and Wang, Jian-Sheng and Tanner, K E and Lidgren, Lars},
  issn         = {1573-4838},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {399--404},
  publisher    = {Kluwer},
  series       = {Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine},
  title        = {Factors influencing the compressive strength of an injectable calcium sulfate-hydroxyapatite cement.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1023254632704},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2003},
}