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International Biofuel Trade - A Study of the Swedish Import

Ericsson, Karin LU and Nilsson, Lars J LU (2004) In Biomass & Bioenergy 26(3). p.205-220
Abstract
Following the development of large-scale use of biomass energy in the EU, international biofuel trade

is a plausible scenario and something that is already taking place in Northern Europe. This paper

focuses on Swedish biofuel imports, both direct and indirect imports, the latter which derive from the

fact that part of the imported pulpwood and timber end up as fuel. The objective is to describe the

biomass import flows, the actors involved and analyse the fundamental drivers for the trade flows.

The rapid expansion of biomass energy, that has taken place in district heating since the early 1990s in

Sweden, has been met partly by imports. The direct biofuel import was estimated to 18 PJ... (More)
Following the development of large-scale use of biomass energy in the EU, international biofuel trade

is a plausible scenario and something that is already taking place in Northern Europe. This paper

focuses on Swedish biofuel imports, both direct and indirect imports, the latter which derive from the

fact that part of the imported pulpwood and timber end up as fuel. The objective is to describe the

biomass import flows, the actors involved and analyse the fundamental drivers for the trade flows.

The rapid expansion of biomass energy, that has taken place in district heating since the early 1990s in

Sweden, has been met partly by imports. The direct biofuel import was estimated to 18 PJ for 2000,

which corresponded to 26% of the biofuel supply in district heating. The total indirect biofuel import

was estimated to 9 PJ of which 5.5 PJ is consumed in the district heating sector. Sawmill wood chips,

decay-damaged stemwood and pellets are imported from Estonia and Latvia, whereas used wood and

solid recovered fuels are imported from Germany and the Netherlands. Tall oil and pellets are imported

from North America.

Key factors related to the Swedish biofuel import are analysed, both from the view of Swedish demand

and from the view of supply in the Baltic countries as well as supply from Germany or the Netherlands.

National differences in energy policy are perhaps the most important driving force behind the

seemingly strange trade flows. Structures in the different national energy systems are also discussed as

well as the transformation process that has taken place in the forest sector in the Baltic countries. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
biofuel market, energy policy, the Baltic countries, yellow waste, green waste, Sweden, biomass, biofuel trade
in
Biomass & Bioenergy
volume
26
issue
3
pages
205 - 220
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000188615900001
  • scopus:0346991462
ISSN
1873-2909
DOI
10.1016/S0961-9534(03)00122-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dfad2ab9-6c67-45a2-aec4-5c314884d693 (old id 127875)
date added to LUP
2007-08-01 08:32:16
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:29:40
@article{dfad2ab9-6c67-45a2-aec4-5c314884d693,
  abstract     = {Following the development of large-scale use of biomass energy in the EU, international biofuel trade<br/><br>
is a plausible scenario and something that is already taking place in Northern Europe. This paper<br/><br>
focuses on Swedish biofuel imports, both direct and indirect imports, the latter which derive from the<br/><br>
fact that part of the imported pulpwood and timber end up as fuel. The objective is to describe the<br/><br>
biomass import flows, the actors involved and analyse the fundamental drivers for the trade flows.<br/><br>
The rapid expansion of biomass energy, that has taken place in district heating since the early 1990s in<br/><br>
Sweden, has been met partly by imports. The direct biofuel import was estimated to 18 PJ for 2000,<br/><br>
which corresponded to 26% of the biofuel supply in district heating. The total indirect biofuel import<br/><br>
was estimated to 9 PJ of which 5.5 PJ is consumed in the district heating sector. Sawmill wood chips,<br/><br>
decay-damaged stemwood and pellets are imported from Estonia and Latvia, whereas used wood and<br/><br>
solid recovered fuels are imported from Germany and the Netherlands. Tall oil and pellets are imported<br/><br>
from North America.<br/><br>
Key factors related to the Swedish biofuel import are analysed, both from the view of Swedish demand<br/><br>
and from the view of supply in the Baltic countries as well as supply from Germany or the Netherlands.<br/><br>
National differences in energy policy are perhaps the most important driving force behind the<br/><br>
seemingly strange trade flows. Structures in the different national energy systems are also discussed as<br/><br>
well as the transformation process that has taken place in the forest sector in the Baltic countries.},
  author       = {Ericsson, Karin and Nilsson, Lars J},
  issn         = {1873-2909},
  keyword      = {biofuel market,energy policy,the Baltic countries,yellow waste,green waste,Sweden,biomass,biofuel trade},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {205--220},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Biomass & Bioenergy},
  title        = {International Biofuel Trade - A Study of the Swedish Import},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0961-9534(03)00122-3},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2004},
}