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Reflections on responsibility and justice Coaching human rights in South Africa

Muhr, Sara Louise LU (2008) In Management Decision 46(8). p.1175-1186
Abstract
Purpose - The purpose of this article is to question whether business is ethical as long as it follows rules, and on this view, to reflect over the relation between responsibility and justice. Design/methodology/approach - To exemplify this relation, the paper is based on in-depth interviews with a human rights consultant. In this way, the paper presents a story from the field and thus follows a narrative method to retell the story of the consultant leading a human rights project in South Africa. Findings - The paper concludes that following rules is not enough to ensure ethical business in a global market place. As global business rests on dynamics and flexibility, it seems limited that most business ethics rests on bureaucratic notions.... (More)
Purpose - The purpose of this article is to question whether business is ethical as long as it follows rules, and on this view, to reflect over the relation between responsibility and justice. Design/methodology/approach - To exemplify this relation, the paper is based on in-depth interviews with a human rights consultant. In this way, the paper presents a story from the field and thus follows a narrative method to retell the story of the consultant leading a human rights project in South Africa. Findings - The paper concludes that following rules is not enough to ensure ethical business in a global market place. As global business rests on dynamics and flexibility, it seems limited that most business ethics rests on bureaucratic notions. The value of also viewing ethical decision-making as personal responsibility is introduced through the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas. Research limitations/implications - The study is based on in depth interviews with one person. Although this method ensures access to deeply personal and thorough knowledge about the event, it also has its limitation and risk of bias. Although this paper points towards some interesting relations between personal responsibility and international/organisational justice, more research is needed in the field of personal responsibility to make stronger conclusions. Practical implications - The paper proposes that people working at the global market place could benefit from being educated in personal ethics and not only bureaucratic notions of ethics. Originality/value - The paper provides valuable insight into the scarcely researched area of personalised business ethics. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
South Africa, Bureaucratic organizations, Narratives, justice, Business ethics, Corporate social responsibility
in
Management Decision
volume
46
issue
8
pages
1175 - 1186
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • wos:000260435600007
  • scopus:52249105585
ISSN
0025-1747
DOI
10.1108/00251740810901372
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ddd59f2b-5436-4fa2-aed6-932642328362 (old id 1283035)
date added to LUP
2009-02-10 12:58:38
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:30:31
@article{ddd59f2b-5436-4fa2-aed6-932642328362,
  abstract     = {Purpose - The purpose of this article is to question whether business is ethical as long as it follows rules, and on this view, to reflect over the relation between responsibility and justice. Design/methodology/approach - To exemplify this relation, the paper is based on in-depth interviews with a human rights consultant. In this way, the paper presents a story from the field and thus follows a narrative method to retell the story of the consultant leading a human rights project in South Africa. Findings - The paper concludes that following rules is not enough to ensure ethical business in a global market place. As global business rests on dynamics and flexibility, it seems limited that most business ethics rests on bureaucratic notions. The value of also viewing ethical decision-making as personal responsibility is introduced through the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas. Research limitations/implications - The study is based on in depth interviews with one person. Although this method ensures access to deeply personal and thorough knowledge about the event, it also has its limitation and risk of bias. Although this paper points towards some interesting relations between personal responsibility and international/organisational justice, more research is needed in the field of personal responsibility to make stronger conclusions. Practical implications - The paper proposes that people working at the global market place could benefit from being educated in personal ethics and not only bureaucratic notions of ethics. Originality/value - The paper provides valuable insight into the scarcely researched area of personalised business ethics.},
  author       = {Muhr, Sara Louise},
  issn         = {0025-1747},
  keyword      = {South Africa,Bureaucratic organizations,Narratives,justice,Business ethics,Corporate social responsibility},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1175--1186},
  publisher    = {Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
  series       = {Management Decision},
  title        = {Reflections on responsibility and justice Coaching human rights in South Africa},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/00251740810901372},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2008},
}