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Beyond the public and private divide: remapping transnational climate governance in the 21st century

Pattberg, Philipp and Stripple, Johannes LU (2008) In International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics 8(4). p.367-388
Abstract
This article provides a first step towards a better theoretical and empirical knowledge of the emerging arena of transnational climate governance. The need for such a re-conceptualization emerges from the increasing relevance of non-state and transnational approaches towards climate change mitigation at a time when the intergovernmental negotiation process has to overcome substantial stalemate and the international arena becomes increasingly fragmented. Based on a brief discussion of the increasing trend towards transnationalization and functional segmentation of the global climate governance arena, we argue that a remapping of climate governance is necessary and needs to take into account different spheres of authority beyond the public... (More)
This article provides a first step towards a better theoretical and empirical knowledge of the emerging arena of transnational climate governance. The need for such a re-conceptualization emerges from the increasing relevance of non-state and transnational approaches towards climate change mitigation at a time when the intergovernmental negotiation process has to overcome substantial stalemate and the international arena becomes increasingly fragmented. Based on a brief discussion of the increasing trend towards transnationalization and functional segmentation of the global climate governance arena, we argue that a remapping of climate governance is necessary and needs to take into account different spheres of authority beyond the public and international. Hence, we provide a brief analysis of how the public/private divide has been conceptualized in Political Science and International Relations. Subsequently, we analyse the emerging transnational climate governance arena. Analytically, we distinguish between different manifestations of transnational climate governance on a continuum ranging from delegated and shared public-private authority to fully non-state and private responses to the climate problem. We suggest that our remapping exercise presented in this article can be a useful starting point for future research on the role and relevance of transnational approaches to the global climate crisis. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Transnational global climate, Climate change, Public-private governance, politics
in
International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics
volume
8
issue
4
pages
367 - 388
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000260781600004
  • scopus:55849096603
ISSN
1573-1553
DOI
10.1007/s10784-008-9085-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0fd7a7fd-9666-4d49-a122-1d6633c5cef4 (old id 1283406)
date added to LUP
2009-02-10 11:34:54
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:39:01
@article{0fd7a7fd-9666-4d49-a122-1d6633c5cef4,
  abstract     = {This article provides a first step towards a better theoretical and empirical knowledge of the emerging arena of transnational climate governance. The need for such a re-conceptualization emerges from the increasing relevance of non-state and transnational approaches towards climate change mitigation at a time when the intergovernmental negotiation process has to overcome substantial stalemate and the international arena becomes increasingly fragmented. Based on a brief discussion of the increasing trend towards transnationalization and functional segmentation of the global climate governance arena, we argue that a remapping of climate governance is necessary and needs to take into account different spheres of authority beyond the public and international. Hence, we provide a brief analysis of how the public/private divide has been conceptualized in Political Science and International Relations. Subsequently, we analyse the emerging transnational climate governance arena. Analytically, we distinguish between different manifestations of transnational climate governance on a continuum ranging from delegated and shared public-private authority to fully non-state and private responses to the climate problem. We suggest that our remapping exercise presented in this article can be a useful starting point for future research on the role and relevance of transnational approaches to the global climate crisis.},
  author       = {Pattberg, Philipp and Stripple, Johannes},
  issn         = {1573-1553},
  keyword      = {Transnational global climate,Climate change,Public-private governance,politics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {367--388},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics},
  title        = {Beyond the public and private divide: remapping transnational climate governance in the 21st century},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10784-008-9085-3},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2008},
}