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Could benefits of epidural analgesia following oesophagectomy be measured by perceived perioperative patient workload?

Bartha, E.; Rudin, Åsa LU ; Flisberg, Per LU ; Lundberg, Johan LU ; Carlsson, P. and Kalman, S. (2008) In Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 52(10). p.1313-1318
Abstract
Background: A controversy exists whether beneficial analgesic effects of epidural analgesia over intravenous analgesia influence the rate of post-operative complications and the length of hospital stay. There is some evidence that favours epidural analgesia following major surgery in high-risk patients. However, there is a controversy as to whether epidural analgesia reduces the intensive care resources following major surgery. In this study, we aimed at comparing the post-operative costs of intensive care in patients receiving epidural or intravenous analgesia. Methods: Clinical data and rates of post-operative complications were extracted from a previously reported trial following thoraco-abdominal oesophagectomy. Cost data for... (More)
Background: A controversy exists whether beneficial analgesic effects of epidural analgesia over intravenous analgesia influence the rate of post-operative complications and the length of hospital stay. There is some evidence that favours epidural analgesia following major surgery in high-risk patients. However, there is a controversy as to whether epidural analgesia reduces the intensive care resources following major surgery. In this study, we aimed at comparing the post-operative costs of intensive care in patients receiving epidural or intravenous analgesia. Methods: Clinical data and rates of post-operative complications were extracted from a previously reported trial following thoraco-abdominal oesophagectomy. Cost data for individual patients included in that trial were retrospectively obtained from administrative records. Two separate phases were defined: costs of pain treatment and the direct cost of intensive care. Results: Higher calculated costs of epidural vs. intravenous pain treatment, 1,037 vs. 410 Euros/patient, were outweighed by lower post-operative costs of intensive care 5,571 vs. 7,921 Euros/patient (NS). Conclusion: Higher costs and better analgesic effects of epidural analgesia compared with intravenous analgesia do not reduce total costs for post-operative care following major surgery. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
volume
52
issue
10
pages
1313 - 1318
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000260131000002
  • scopus:54049152764
ISSN
0001-5172
DOI
10.1111/j.1399-6576.2008.01734.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
68e4683e-337d-48cd-a719-b0f7d20d5c05 (old id 1285094)
date added to LUP
2009-02-06 10:43:15
date last changed
2017-04-09 03:36:40
@article{68e4683e-337d-48cd-a719-b0f7d20d5c05,
  abstract     = {Background: A controversy exists whether beneficial analgesic effects of epidural analgesia over intravenous analgesia influence the rate of post-operative complications and the length of hospital stay. There is some evidence that favours epidural analgesia following major surgery in high-risk patients. However, there is a controversy as to whether epidural analgesia reduces the intensive care resources following major surgery. In this study, we aimed at comparing the post-operative costs of intensive care in patients receiving epidural or intravenous analgesia. Methods: Clinical data and rates of post-operative complications were extracted from a previously reported trial following thoraco-abdominal oesophagectomy. Cost data for individual patients included in that trial were retrospectively obtained from administrative records. Two separate phases were defined: costs of pain treatment and the direct cost of intensive care. Results: Higher calculated costs of epidural vs. intravenous pain treatment, 1,037 vs. 410 Euros/patient, were outweighed by lower post-operative costs of intensive care 5,571 vs. 7,921 Euros/patient (NS). Conclusion: Higher costs and better analgesic effects of epidural analgesia compared with intravenous analgesia do not reduce total costs for post-operative care following major surgery.},
  author       = {Bartha, E. and Rudin, Åsa and Flisberg, Per and Lundberg, Johan and Carlsson, P. and Kalman, S.},
  issn         = {0001-5172},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1313--1318},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Could benefits of epidural analgesia following oesophagectomy be measured by perceived perioperative patient workload?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-6576.2008.01734.x},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2008},
}