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Gender differences in lumbar disc herniation surgery

Strömqvist, Fredrik LU ; Ahmad, Murad; Hildingsson, Christer; Jönsson, Bo LU and Strömqvist, Björn LU (2008) In Acta Orthopaedica 79(5). p.643-649
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although there have been numerous publications on lumbar disc herniation (LDH) treated surgically, there has been little interest in sex differences. It has been shown in many studies that sex differences may be important in certain diseases. We therefore reviewed consecutive register material from one institution for possible gender differences in pre- and postoperative parameters in patients operated for lumbar disc herniation.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Pre- and postoperative parameters for all patients operated on at the Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital over 6 years (2000-2005 inclusive) (301 patients, 165 males) were analyzed regarding sex differences.

RESULTS: Statistically... (More)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although there have been numerous publications on lumbar disc herniation (LDH) treated surgically, there has been little interest in sex differences. It has been shown in many studies that sex differences may be important in certain diseases. We therefore reviewed consecutive register material from one institution for possible gender differences in pre- and postoperative parameters in patients operated for lumbar disc herniation.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Pre- and postoperative parameters for all patients operated on at the Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital over 6 years (2000-2005 inclusive) (301 patients, 165 males) were analyzed regarding sex differences.

RESULTS: Statistically significant and clinically relevant sex differences were found. Preoperatively, females had more pronounced back pain and disability, and also lower quality of life in some respects. At 1-year followup, females reported a higher rate of consumption of analgesics, a higher degree of postoperative back and leg pain, and less improvement regarding disability and some aspects of quality of life. Relative improvement, rate of return to work, and satisfaction with the outcome of surgery were not, however, statistically significantly different between females and males.

INTERPRETATION: There are statistically significant differences between the sexes in lumbar disc herniation surgery regarding basic demographic status and postoperative status, whereas the surgical effect is similar. Further investigations should focus on whether there is a true sex difference or whether these differences are due to selection for surgery, differences in proneness to seek medical advice or to accept/choose surgery, or other unknown factors.

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organization
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Back Pain, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Intervertebral Disc Displacement, Lumbar Vertebrae, Male, Middle Aged, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Pain Measurement, Patient Satisfaction, Quality of Life, Registries, Sex Distribution, Sex Factors, Treatment Outcome, Journal Article
in
Acta Orthopaedica
volume
79
issue
5
pages
7 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000259779300011
  • scopus:53449083010
ISSN
1745-3682
DOI
10.1080/17453670810016669http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453670810016669
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8333a391-7d22-4a5a-b4a2-e0ae7ae971fd (old id 1285936)
date added to LUP
2009-02-04 10:36:51
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:18:25
@article{8333a391-7d22-4a5a-b4a2-e0ae7ae971fd,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although there have been numerous publications on lumbar disc herniation (LDH) treated surgically, there has been little interest in sex differences. It has been shown in many studies that sex differences may be important in certain diseases. We therefore reviewed consecutive register material from one institution for possible gender differences in pre- and postoperative parameters in patients operated for lumbar disc herniation.</p><p>PATIENTS AND METHODS: Pre- and postoperative parameters for all patients operated on at the Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital over 6 years (2000-2005 inclusive) (301 patients, 165 males) were analyzed regarding sex differences.</p><p>RESULTS: Statistically significant and clinically relevant sex differences were found. Preoperatively, females had more pronounced back pain and disability, and also lower quality of life in some respects. At 1-year followup, females reported a higher rate of consumption of analgesics, a higher degree of postoperative back and leg pain, and less improvement regarding disability and some aspects of quality of life. Relative improvement, rate of return to work, and satisfaction with the outcome of surgery were not, however, statistically significantly different between females and males.</p><p>INTERPRETATION: There are statistically significant differences between the sexes in lumbar disc herniation surgery regarding basic demographic status and postoperative status, whereas the surgical effect is similar. Further investigations should focus on whether there is a true sex difference or whether these differences are due to selection for surgery, differences in proneness to seek medical advice or to accept/choose surgery, or other unknown factors.</p>},
  author       = {Strömqvist, Fredrik and Ahmad, Murad and Hildingsson, Christer and Jönsson, Bo and Strömqvist, Björn},
  issn         = {1745-3682},
  keyword      = {Adolescent,Adult,Aged,Aged, 80 and over,Back Pain,Female,Follow-Up Studies,Humans,Intervertebral Disc Displacement,Lumbar Vertebrae,Male,Middle Aged,Outcome Assessment (Health Care),Pain Measurement,Patient Satisfaction,Quality of Life,Registries,Sex Distribution,Sex Factors,Treatment Outcome,Journal Article},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {643--649},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Orthopaedica},
  title        = {Gender differences in lumbar disc herniation surgery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453670810016669http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453670810016669},
  volume       = {79},
  year         = {2008},
}