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Density functional studies of solvation forces in hard sphere polymer solutions confined between adsorbing walls. I. Solvent effects and dependence on surface potential range.

Forsman, Jan LU ; Woodward, C E and Freasier, B C (2003) In Journal of Chemical Physics 118(16). p.7672-7681
Abstract
Solvation forces between large surfaces in athermal polymer solutions, in which both solvent particles and polymers are adsorbed at the surfaces, are studied with density functional theory. We investigate how the range of the surface potential affects the net interaction between the surfaces. Predictions from treatments in which the solvent is explicitly induced are compared with those obtained with more approximate models, where the solvent is either neglected, or enters the description implicitly. The results are interpreted via comparisons with simpler model systems. It is shown that a long-ranged surface potential, acting equally on monomers and solvent, leads to a solvent dominated repulsive solvation force, while polymer specific... (More)
Solvation forces between large surfaces in athermal polymer solutions, in which both solvent particles and polymers are adsorbed at the surfaces, are studied with density functional theory. We investigate how the range of the surface potential affects the net interaction between the surfaces. Predictions from treatments in which the solvent is explicitly induced are compared with those obtained with more approximate models, where the solvent is either neglected, or enters the description implicitly. The results are interpreted via comparisons with simpler model systems. It is shown that a long-ranged surface potential, acting equally on monomers and solvent, leads to a solvent dominated repulsive solvation force, while polymer specific contributions dominate the net interactions when the adsorption potential has a short range. Effects of preferential polymer adsorption are also investigated. ©2003 American Institute of Physics. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Chemical Physics
volume
118
issue
16
pages
7672 - 7681
publisher
American Institute of Physics
external identifiers
  • wos:000182157700056
  • scopus:0038060683
ISSN
0021-9606
DOI
10.1063/1.1562618
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a6537171-51ad-4e33-95a0-30c4cb1cf607 (old id 128674)
date added to LUP
2007-07-17 09:35:05
date last changed
2018-10-03 09:28:47
@article{a6537171-51ad-4e33-95a0-30c4cb1cf607,
  abstract     = {Solvation forces between large surfaces in athermal polymer solutions, in which both solvent particles and polymers are adsorbed at the surfaces, are studied with density functional theory. We investigate how the range of the surface potential affects the net interaction between the surfaces. Predictions from treatments in which the solvent is explicitly induced are compared with those obtained with more approximate models, where the solvent is either neglected, or enters the description implicitly. The results are interpreted via comparisons with simpler model systems. It is shown that a long-ranged surface potential, acting equally on monomers and solvent, leads to a solvent dominated repulsive solvation force, while polymer specific contributions dominate the net interactions when the adsorption potential has a short range. Effects of preferential polymer adsorption are also investigated. ©2003 American Institute of Physics.},
  author       = {Forsman, Jan and Woodward, C E and Freasier, B C},
  issn         = {0021-9606},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {16},
  pages        = {7672--7681},
  publisher    = {American Institute of Physics},
  series       = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
  title        = {Density functional studies of solvation forces in hard sphere polymer solutions confined between adsorbing walls. I. Solvent effects and dependence on surface potential range.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1562618},
  volume       = {118},
  year         = {2003},
}