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Risk of lymphoproliferative disorders among first-degree relatives of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia patients: a population-based study in Sweden

Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Bjorkholm, Magnus; Goldin, Lynn R.; McMaster, Mary L.; Turesson, Ingemar LU and Landgren, Ola (2008) In Blood 112(8). p.3052-3056
Abstract
A role for genetic factors in the etiology of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM) is implicated based on prior findings from multiply affected families and small case-control and cohort studies. We identified 2144 LPL/WM patients (1539 WM [72%] and 605 LPL [28%]) diagnosed in Sweden, 8279 population-based matched controls, and linkable first-degree relatives of patients (n = 6177) and controls (n = 24 609). Using a marginal survival model, we calculated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals as measures of familial aggregation. We found first-degree relatives of LPL/WM patients to have 20-fold (4.1-98.4), 3.0-fold (2.0-4.4), 3.4-fold (1.7-6.6), and 5.0-fold (1.3-18.9) increased risks of developing LPL/WM,... (More)
A role for genetic factors in the etiology of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM) is implicated based on prior findings from multiply affected families and small case-control and cohort studies. We identified 2144 LPL/WM patients (1539 WM [72%] and 605 LPL [28%]) diagnosed in Sweden, 8279 population-based matched controls, and linkable first-degree relatives of patients (n = 6177) and controls (n = 24 609). Using a marginal survival model, we calculated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals as measures of familial aggregation. We found first-degree relatives of LPL/WM patients to have 20-fold (4.1-98.4), 3.0-fold (2.0-4.4), 3.4-fold (1.7-6.6), and 5.0-fold (1.3-18.9) increased risks of developing LPL/WM, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), respectively. However, there was no evidence of an increased risk of developing multiple myeloma or Hodgkin lymphoma. In analyses stratified by type of first-degree relative (parent, sibling, offspring), age at diagnosis of the probands (greater or less than 70 years), and sex of the first-degree relative, we did not observe the risk estimates to be significantly different compared with the overall analyses. Our findings of highly increased risks of developing LPL/WM, NHL, CLL, and MGUS support the operation of shared susceptibility genes that predispose to LPL/WM and other lymphoproliferative disorders. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Blood
volume
112
issue
8
pages
3052 - 3056
publisher
American Society of Hematology
external identifiers
  • wos:000259866100016
  • scopus:54049129700
ISSN
1528-0020
DOI
10.1182/blood-2008-06-162768
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c608732e-8a51-479e-8d80-6a1e14c3ec2e (old id 1286819)
date added to LUP
2009-01-29 10:44:59
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:38:11
@article{c608732e-8a51-479e-8d80-6a1e14c3ec2e,
  abstract     = {A role for genetic factors in the etiology of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM) is implicated based on prior findings from multiply affected families and small case-control and cohort studies. We identified 2144 LPL/WM patients (1539 WM [72%] and 605 LPL [28%]) diagnosed in Sweden, 8279 population-based matched controls, and linkable first-degree relatives of patients (n = 6177) and controls (n = 24 609). Using a marginal survival model, we calculated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals as measures of familial aggregation. We found first-degree relatives of LPL/WM patients to have 20-fold (4.1-98.4), 3.0-fold (2.0-4.4), 3.4-fold (1.7-6.6), and 5.0-fold (1.3-18.9) increased risks of developing LPL/WM, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), respectively. However, there was no evidence of an increased risk of developing multiple myeloma or Hodgkin lymphoma. In analyses stratified by type of first-degree relative (parent, sibling, offspring), age at diagnosis of the probands (greater or less than 70 years), and sex of the first-degree relative, we did not observe the risk estimates to be significantly different compared with the overall analyses. Our findings of highly increased risks of developing LPL/WM, NHL, CLL, and MGUS support the operation of shared susceptibility genes that predispose to LPL/WM and other lymphoproliferative disorders.},
  author       = {Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y. and Bjorkholm, Magnus and Goldin, Lynn R. and McMaster, Mary L. and Turesson, Ingemar and Landgren, Ola},
  issn         = {1528-0020},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {3052--3056},
  publisher    = {American Society of Hematology},
  series       = {Blood},
  title        = {Risk of lymphoproliferative disorders among first-degree relatives of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia patients: a population-based study in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2008-06-162768},
  volume       = {112},
  year         = {2008},
}