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Antibiotics prescription in primary care: a 5-year follow-up of an educational programme

Molstad, S; Ekedahl, Anders LU ; Hovelius, B and Thimansson, H (1994) In Family Practice 11(3). p.282-286
Abstract
An educational programme on the use of antibiotics for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in primary care, initiated among district physicians at the Community Health Centre of Hoor, Sweden in 1985, resulted in an overall reduction in prescriptions for antibiotics, particularly broad-spectrum antibiotics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term effects of the programme on antibiotic prescription patterns at the centre. Since 1985, computerized records have been kept of every consultation at the centre, including details of the attending physician, the patient, diagnosis and type of antibiotic prescribed. Moreover, during a 3-month period in 1991, each pharmacy in the region recorded details of all prescriptions for... (More)
An educational programme on the use of antibiotics for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in primary care, initiated among district physicians at the Community Health Centre of Hoor, Sweden in 1985, resulted in an overall reduction in prescriptions for antibiotics, particularly broad-spectrum antibiotics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term effects of the programme on antibiotic prescription patterns at the centre. Since 1985, computerized records have been kept of every consultation at the centre, including details of the attending physician, the patient, diagnosis and type of antibiotic prescribed. Moreover, during a 3-month period in 1991, each pharmacy in the region recorded details of all prescriptions for antibiotics dispensed. Estimated immediately after the programme, the proportion of RTI patients prescribed antibiotics had fallen to 44%, a figure virtually unchanged 5 years later. During the subsequent five-year period, antibiotics dispensed at the pharmacy in Hoor were further reduced from 14.1 to 13.2 defined daily doses 1000 inhabitants-1 day-1. As compared with district physicians at other community health centres in the region, those at Hoor prescribed more penicillin V (80% of all antibiotic prescriptions) and less broad-spectrum antibiotics. The educational programme, combined with an active interest among district physicians at Hoor in current research into antibiotic usage, has thus wrought enduring changes in the pattern of antibiotic prescription. A probable contributory factor was the district physicians' awareness that the computerized registration of diagnosis and treatment enables prescription patterns to be audited at an individual level. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Family Practice
volume
11
issue
3
pages
282 - 286
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:0028170095
ISSN
1460-2229
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
959680d3-b237-484c-8178-b605d9bb7863 (old id 1296318)
alternative location
http://fampra.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/11/3/282
date added to LUP
2009-07-31 14:41:21
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:20:28
@article{959680d3-b237-484c-8178-b605d9bb7863,
  abstract     = {An educational programme on the use of antibiotics for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in primary care, initiated among district physicians at the Community Health Centre of Hoor, Sweden in 1985, resulted in an overall reduction in prescriptions for antibiotics, particularly broad-spectrum antibiotics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term effects of the programme on antibiotic prescription patterns at the centre. Since 1985, computerized records have been kept of every consultation at the centre, including details of the attending physician, the patient, diagnosis and type of antibiotic prescribed. Moreover, during a 3-month period in 1991, each pharmacy in the region recorded details of all prescriptions for antibiotics dispensed. Estimated immediately after the programme, the proportion of RTI patients prescribed antibiotics had fallen to 44%, a figure virtually unchanged 5 years later. During the subsequent five-year period, antibiotics dispensed at the pharmacy in Hoor were further reduced from 14.1 to 13.2 defined daily doses 1000 inhabitants-1 day-1. As compared with district physicians at other community health centres in the region, those at Hoor prescribed more penicillin V (80% of all antibiotic prescriptions) and less broad-spectrum antibiotics. The educational programme, combined with an active interest among district physicians at Hoor in current research into antibiotic usage, has thus wrought enduring changes in the pattern of antibiotic prescription. A probable contributory factor was the district physicians' awareness that the computerized registration of diagnosis and treatment enables prescription patterns to be audited at an individual level.},
  author       = {Molstad, S and Ekedahl, Anders and Hovelius, B and Thimansson, H},
  issn         = {1460-2229},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {282--286},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Family Practice},
  title        = {Antibiotics prescription in primary care: a 5-year follow-up of an educational programme},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {1994},
}