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Survival of women with breast cancer in relation to smoking

Manjer, Jonas LU ; Andersson, Ingvar LU ; Berglund, Göran LU ; Bondesson, Lennart; Garne, J P; Janzon, Lars LU ; Malina, Janne and Matson, Sophia (2000) In European Journal of Surgery 166(11). p.852-858
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare survival of patients with breast cancer who had never smoked, were smokers, and who were ex-smokers. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: City of Malmo, Sweden. PATIENTS: 792 patients with breast cancer diagnosed between 1977-1986 in the Malmo mammographic screening trial. INTERVENTIONS: Follow-up of breast cancer cases through record-linkage with the Swedish Cause of Death Registry. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Death from breast cancer. Relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) of death from breast cancer was calculated for different smoking groups using Cox's proportional hazards analysis. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12.1 years, 145 patients died of breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality was 1347/10(5)... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To compare survival of patients with breast cancer who had never smoked, were smokers, and who were ex-smokers. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: City of Malmo, Sweden. PATIENTS: 792 patients with breast cancer diagnosed between 1977-1986 in the Malmo mammographic screening trial. INTERVENTIONS: Follow-up of breast cancer cases through record-linkage with the Swedish Cause of Death Registry. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Death from breast cancer. Relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) of death from breast cancer was calculated for different smoking groups using Cox's proportional hazards analysis. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12.1 years, 145 patients died of breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality was 1347/10(5) person-years in those who had never smoked, 1941/10(5) in smokers, and 1493/10(5) in ex-smokers. The crude RR for smokers and ex-smokers, compared with those who had never smoked were 1.44 (1.01 to 2.06) and 1.13 (0.66 to 1.94), respectively. The RR associated with smoking remained significant after adjustment for age and stage at diagnosis, 2.14 (1.47 to 3.10), and other potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Survival after breast cancer was, as expected, strongly related to stage at diagnosis. However, stage by stage there was considerable variation between individual patients. We conclude that differences with regard to exposure to smoking contribute to this heterogeneity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Surgery
volume
166
issue
11
pages
852 - 858
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000165204900003
  • scopus:0033758244
ISSN
1102-4151
DOI
10.1080/110241500447227
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fe69775c-c75b-4605-a778-4e5781cf63d6 (old id 1296777)
date added to LUP
2009-07-15 14:14:32
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:20:59
@article{fe69775c-c75b-4605-a778-4e5781cf63d6,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To compare survival of patients with breast cancer who had never smoked, were smokers, and who were ex-smokers. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: City of Malmo, Sweden. PATIENTS: 792 patients with breast cancer diagnosed between 1977-1986 in the Malmo mammographic screening trial. INTERVENTIONS: Follow-up of breast cancer cases through record-linkage with the Swedish Cause of Death Registry. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Death from breast cancer. Relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) of death from breast cancer was calculated for different smoking groups using Cox's proportional hazards analysis. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12.1 years, 145 patients died of breast cancer. Breast cancer mortality was 1347/10(5) person-years in those who had never smoked, 1941/10(5) in smokers, and 1493/10(5) in ex-smokers. The crude RR for smokers and ex-smokers, compared with those who had never smoked were 1.44 (1.01 to 2.06) and 1.13 (0.66 to 1.94), respectively. The RR associated with smoking remained significant after adjustment for age and stage at diagnosis, 2.14 (1.47 to 3.10), and other potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Survival after breast cancer was, as expected, strongly related to stage at diagnosis. However, stage by stage there was considerable variation between individual patients. We conclude that differences with regard to exposure to smoking contribute to this heterogeneity.},
  author       = {Manjer, Jonas and Andersson, Ingvar and Berglund, Göran and Bondesson, Lennart and Garne, J P and Janzon, Lars and Malina, Janne and Matson, Sophia},
  issn         = {1102-4151},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {852--858},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {European Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Survival of women with breast cancer in relation to smoking},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/110241500447227},
  volume       = {166},
  year         = {2000},
}