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Psychological aspects of screening in families with hereditary prostate cancer

Bratt, Ola LU ; Emanuelsson, Monica and Gronberg, Henrik (2003) In Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology1967-01-01+01:002013-01-01+01:00 37(1). p.5-9
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Approximately 5-10% of prostate cancer cases are caused by dominantly inherited susceptibility to the disease. Although advances have been made in research concerning the genetic mechanisms of hereditary prostate cancer, little is known about the psychological consequences. The aim of this study was to assess possible negative psychological effects of screening for prostate cancer in a high-risk population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was based on a previous study of risk perception, screening practice and interest in genetic testing among unaffected men in families with hereditary prostate cancer. The present study included 87 men from the previous study who were screened regularly for prostate cancer. Of these, 74 men... (More)
OBJECTIVE: Approximately 5-10% of prostate cancer cases are caused by dominantly inherited susceptibility to the disease. Although advances have been made in research concerning the genetic mechanisms of hereditary prostate cancer, little is known about the psychological consequences. The aim of this study was to assess possible negative psychological effects of screening for prostate cancer in a high-risk population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was based on a previous study of risk perception, screening practice and interest in genetic testing among unaffected men in families with hereditary prostate cancer. The present study included 87 men from the previous study who were screened regularly for prostate cancer. Of these, 74 men agreed to receive two further questionnaires, both of which included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) and the Impact of Event Scale (IES), one of which was filled in on the day of the next screening visit and the other 4-6 weeks later. RESULTS: The response rate was 77% (57/74). There were no statistically significant differences in total or subscale HAD or IES scores between the two points of measurement. There was a trend towards slightly higher HAD scores on the day of the screening visit, but the difference was so small that we did not consider it clinically relevant. In an attempt to identify risk factors for a negative impact of screening several subgroup analyses were performed, but none of these subgroups had significantly higher scores on the day of the visit than afterwards. CONCLUSION: Most men with a high hereditary risk of developing prostate cancer do not experience severe psychological adverse effects resulting from attendance for screening. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology1967-01-01+01:002013-01-01+01:00
volume
37
issue
1
pages
5 - 9
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000180961100001
  • scopus:0037282275
ISSN
0036-5599
DOI
10.1080/00365590310008604
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
a3d6d366-77e1-439a-a591-bf48a0da854a (old id 1297615)
date added to LUP
2009-07-14 09:12:30
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:49:54
@article{a3d6d366-77e1-439a-a591-bf48a0da854a,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: Approximately 5-10% of prostate cancer cases are caused by dominantly inherited susceptibility to the disease. Although advances have been made in research concerning the genetic mechanisms of hereditary prostate cancer, little is known about the psychological consequences. The aim of this study was to assess possible negative psychological effects of screening for prostate cancer in a high-risk population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was based on a previous study of risk perception, screening practice and interest in genetic testing among unaffected men in families with hereditary prostate cancer. The present study included 87 men from the previous study who were screened regularly for prostate cancer. Of these, 74 men agreed to receive two further questionnaires, both of which included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) and the Impact of Event Scale (IES), one of which was filled in on the day of the next screening visit and the other 4-6 weeks later. RESULTS: The response rate was 77% (57/74). There were no statistically significant differences in total or subscale HAD or IES scores between the two points of measurement. There was a trend towards slightly higher HAD scores on the day of the screening visit, but the difference was so small that we did not consider it clinically relevant. In an attempt to identify risk factors for a negative impact of screening several subgroup analyses were performed, but none of these subgroups had significantly higher scores on the day of the visit than afterwards. CONCLUSION: Most men with a high hereditary risk of developing prostate cancer do not experience severe psychological adverse effects resulting from attendance for screening.},
  author       = {Bratt, Ola and Emanuelsson, Monica and Gronberg, Henrik},
  issn         = {0036-5599},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {5--9},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology1967-01-01+01:002013-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Psychological aspects of screening in families with hereditary prostate cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365590310008604},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2003},
}