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Surgical infants on total parenteral nutrition have impaired cytokine responses to microbial challenge

Cruccetti, A; Pierro, A; Uronen-Hansson, Heli LU and Klein, N (2003) In Journal of Pediatric Surgery 38(1). p.138-142
Abstract
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Cytokines are essential for the prevention of microbial infections. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in infancy is associated with an increased risk of infection, and this could be related to altered cytokine production. The aim of the study was to determine if cytokine production is altered in monocytes from surgical infants receiving TPN. METHODS: There were 3 study groups: (a) infants receiving TPN, (b) enterally fed healthy control infants, and (c) enterally fed healthy control adults. Blood samples were incubated with either Escherichia coli LPS, Staphylococcus epidermidis, or with medium alone. Flow cytometry was used to measure monocyte intracellular cytokine: tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin... (More)
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Cytokines are essential for the prevention of microbial infections. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in infancy is associated with an increased risk of infection, and this could be related to altered cytokine production. The aim of the study was to determine if cytokine production is altered in monocytes from surgical infants receiving TPN. METHODS: There were 3 study groups: (a) infants receiving TPN, (b) enterally fed healthy control infants, and (c) enterally fed healthy control adults. Blood samples were incubated with either Escherichia coli LPS, Staphylococcus epidermidis, or with medium alone. Flow cytometry was used to measure monocyte intracellular cytokine: tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1beta. RESULTS: After LPS stimulation, the percent of monocytes producing TNF-alpha and IL-6 were lower in infants on TPN than both control infants and adults. This was most apparent for TNF-alpha. The difference for IL-1beta was significant only between infant on TPN and control adults. When blood was stimulated with S. epidermidis, all 3 cytokines were significantly lower in the TPN group compared with control adults. However, the differences between infants on TPN and infant controls only reached statistical significance for IL-6. CONCLUSIONS: The inflammatory response to bacterial challenge is impaired in infants on TPN compared with enterally fed infants or adults. The pattern of this response may be dependent on the nature of the microbial challenge. Our results indicate that the susceptibility of TPN-fed surgical infants to bacterial infections may in part be caused by impaired cytokine responses after bacterial invasion. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Pediatric Surgery
volume
38
issue
1
pages
138 - 142
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000180260400050
  • scopus:0037239933
ISSN
1531-5037
DOI
10.1053/jpsu.2003.50028
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
5a08858c-356b-485d-b086-1a5a5179d346 (old id 1297677)
date added to LUP
2009-07-14 10:10:44
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:26:41
@article{5a08858c-356b-485d-b086-1a5a5179d346,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Cytokines are essential for the prevention of microbial infections. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in infancy is associated with an increased risk of infection, and this could be related to altered cytokine production. The aim of the study was to determine if cytokine production is altered in monocytes from surgical infants receiving TPN. METHODS: There were 3 study groups: (a) infants receiving TPN, (b) enterally fed healthy control infants, and (c) enterally fed healthy control adults. Blood samples were incubated with either Escherichia coli LPS, Staphylococcus epidermidis, or with medium alone. Flow cytometry was used to measure monocyte intracellular cytokine: tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1beta. RESULTS: After LPS stimulation, the percent of monocytes producing TNF-alpha and IL-6 were lower in infants on TPN than both control infants and adults. This was most apparent for TNF-alpha. The difference for IL-1beta was significant only between infant on TPN and control adults. When blood was stimulated with S. epidermidis, all 3 cytokines were significantly lower in the TPN group compared with control adults. However, the differences between infants on TPN and infant controls only reached statistical significance for IL-6. CONCLUSIONS: The inflammatory response to bacterial challenge is impaired in infants on TPN compared with enterally fed infants or adults. The pattern of this response may be dependent on the nature of the microbial challenge. Our results indicate that the susceptibility of TPN-fed surgical infants to bacterial infections may in part be caused by impaired cytokine responses after bacterial invasion.},
  author       = {Cruccetti, A and Pierro, A and Uronen-Hansson, Heli and Klein, N},
  issn         = {1531-5037},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {138--142},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Pediatric Surgery},
  title        = {Surgical infants on total parenteral nutrition have impaired cytokine responses to microbial challenge},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/jpsu.2003.50028},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2003},
}