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Wearable comfort and performance expectancy predict user acceptance of a sensor-based home lighting system

Maini Gerhardsson, Kiran LU (2018) Annual meeting of the Ergonomics & Human Factors Europé Chapter (HFES), Berlin, Germany. p.6-6
Abstract (Swedish)
The aim was to evaluate an early prototype of a personalised home lighting system comprising body-worn loggers, a mobile phone, and LED-based lighting with variable intensity and colour temperature. A convenience sample (N = 28, 50% female) wore the devices for 24 hours in the field and were given a demonstration of the lighting system components in a full-scale model of a studio apartment. Participants then assessed their acceptance of the lighting system using a validated questionnaire. As user comfort and design were expected to influence the outcome, additional questions addressed the physical comfort and visual appearance of the body-worn loggers. To cross-check the quantitative findings and to address issues not included,... (More)
The aim was to evaluate an early prototype of a personalised home lighting system comprising body-worn loggers, a mobile phone, and LED-based lighting with variable intensity and colour temperature. A convenience sample (N = 28, 50% female) wore the devices for 24 hours in the field and were given a demonstration of the lighting system components in a full-scale model of a studio apartment. Participants then assessed their acceptance of the lighting system using a validated questionnaire. As user comfort and design were expected to influence the outcome, additional questions addressed the physical comfort and visual appearance of the body-worn loggers. To cross-check the quantitative findings and to address issues not included, semi-structured interviews were held in the full-scale model. In a hierarchical linear regression, physical comfort of the loggers explained 35.8% of the variance of ‘the behavioural intention to use the system in the future’. Adding ‘performance expectancy’ to the model accounted for 50.6% more variance in behavioural intention. The thematic analysis of the qualitative data provided more understanding of how physical, psychological and social comfort of wearing the devices and carrying the phone in the home, influenced participants’ willingness to use the home lighting system in the future. (Less)
Abstract
The aim was to evaluate an early prototype of a personalised home lighting system comprising body-worn loggers, a mobile phone, and LED-based lighting with variable intensity and colour temperature. A convenience sample (N = 28, 50% female) wore the devices for 24 hours in the field and were given a demonstration of the lighting system components in a full-scale model of a studio apartment. Participants then assessed their acceptance of the lighting system using a validated questionnaire. As user comfort and design were expected to influence the outcome, additional questions addressed the physical comfort and visual appearance of the body-worn loggers. To cross-check the quantitative findings and to address issues not included,... (More)
The aim was to evaluate an early prototype of a personalised home lighting system comprising body-worn loggers, a mobile phone, and LED-based lighting with variable intensity and colour temperature. A convenience sample (N = 28, 50% female) wore the devices for 24 hours in the field and were given a demonstration of the lighting system components in a full-scale model of a studio apartment. Participants then assessed their acceptance of the lighting system using a validated questionnaire. As user comfort and design were expected to influence the outcome, additional questions addressed the physical comfort and visual appearance of the body-worn loggers. To cross-check the quantitative findings and to address issues not included, semi-structured interviews were held in the full-scale model. In a hierarchical linear regression, physical comfort of the loggers explained 35.8% of the variance of ‘the behavioural intention to use the system in the future’. Adding ‘performance expectancy’ to the model accounted for 50.6% more variance in behavioural intention. The thematic analysis of the qualitative data provided more understanding of how physical, psychological and social comfort of wearing the devices and carrying the phone in the home, influenced participants’ willingness to use the home lighting system in the future. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Residential, Lighting, User acceptance, Wearable comfort
pages
1 pages
conference name
Annual meeting of the Ergonomics & Human Factors Europé Chapter (HFES), Berlin, Germany.
conference location
Berlin, Germany
conference dates
2018-10-08 - 2018-10-10
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
12a07586-c1bc-4220-bcf9-0a3d650d1d0c
alternative location
https://www.hfes-europe.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/AbstractsBerlin2018.pdf
date added to LUP
2018-12-04 18:03:33
date last changed
2018-12-07 08:56:07
@misc{12a07586-c1bc-4220-bcf9-0a3d650d1d0c,
  abstract     = {The aim was to evaluate an early prototype of a personalised home lighting system comprising body-worn loggers, a mobile phone, and LED-based lighting with variable intensity and colour temperature. A convenience sample (N = 28, 50% female) wore the devices for 24 hours in the field and were given a demonstration of the lighting system components in a full-scale model of a studio apartment. Participants then assessed their acceptance of the lighting system using a validated questionnaire. As user comfort and design were expected to influence the outcome, additional questions addressed the physical comfort and visual appearance of the body-worn loggers. To cross-check the quantitative findings and to address issues not included, semi-structured interviews were held in the full-scale model. In a hierarchical linear regression, physical comfort of the loggers explained 35.8% of the variance of ‘the behavioural intention to use the system in the future’. Adding ‘performance expectancy’ to the model accounted for 50.6% more variance in behavioural intention. The thematic analysis of the qualitative data provided more understanding of how physical, psychological and social comfort of wearing the devices and carrying the phone in the home, influenced participants’ willingness to use the home lighting system in the future. },
  author       = {Maini Gerhardsson, Kiran},
  keyword      = {Residential,Lighting,User acceptance,Wearable comfort},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Berlin, Germany},
  pages        = {6--6},
  title        = {Wearable comfort and performance expectancy predict user acceptance of a sensor-based home lighting system},
  year         = {2018},
}