Advanced

GAIA: Composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy

Perryman, M. A. C.; de Boer, K. S.; Gilmore, G.; Høg, E.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Lindegren, Lennart LU ; Luri, X.; Mignard, F.; Pace, O. and de Zeeuw, P. T. (2001) In Astronomy & Astrophysics 369. p.339-363
Abstract
The GAIA astrometric mission has recently been approved as one of thenext two ``cornerstones'' of ESA's science programme, with a launch datetarget of not later than mid-2012. GAIA will provide positional andradial velocity measurements with the accuracies needed to produce astereoscopic and kinematic census of about one billion stars throughoutour Galaxy (and into the Local Group), amounting to about 1 percent ofthe Galactic stellar population. GAIA's main scientific goal is toclarify the origin and history of our Galaxy, from a quantitative censusof the stellar populations. It will advance questions such as when thestars in our Galaxy formed, when and how it was assembled, and itsdistribution of dark matter. The survey aims for... (More)
The GAIA astrometric mission has recently been approved as one of thenext two ``cornerstones'' of ESA's science programme, with a launch datetarget of not later than mid-2012. GAIA will provide positional andradial velocity measurements with the accuracies needed to produce astereoscopic and kinematic census of about one billion stars throughoutour Galaxy (and into the Local Group), amounting to about 1 percent ofthe Galactic stellar population. GAIA's main scientific goal is toclarify the origin and history of our Galaxy, from a quantitative censusof the stellar populations. It will advance questions such as when thestars in our Galaxy formed, when and how it was assembled, and itsdistribution of dark matter. The survey aims for completeness to V=20mag, with accuracies of about 10 mu as at 15 mag. Combined withastrophysical information for each star, provided by on-boardmulti-colour photometry and (limited) spectroscopy, these data will havethe precision necessary to quantify the early formation, and subsequentdynamical, chemical and star formation evolution of our Galaxy.Additional products include detection and orbital classification of tensof thousands of extra-Solar planetary systems, and a comprehensivesurvey of some 10<SUP>5</SUP>-10<SUP>6</SUP> minor bodies in our SolarSystem, through galaxies in the nearby Universe, to some 500 000 distantquasars. It will provide a number of stringent new tests of generalrelativity and cosmology. The complete satellite system was evaluated aspart of a detailed technology study, including a detailed payloaddesign, corresponding accuracy assesments, and results from a prototypedata reduction development. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
INSTRUMENTATION: MISCELLANEOUS, SPACE VEHICLES: INSTRUMENTS, ASTROMETRY, GALAXY: GENERAL, TECHNIQUES: PHOTOMETRIC, TECHNIQUES: RADIAL VELOCITIES
in
Astronomy & Astrophysics
volume
369
pages
339 - 363
publisher
EDP Sciences
external identifiers
  • scopus:0035298187
ISSN
0004-6361
DOI
10.1051/0004-6361:20010085
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6c084128-76de-4835-a1df-d74fa0296b72 (old id 130220)
date added to LUP
2007-07-13 14:55:55
date last changed
2018-10-14 04:06:00
@article{6c084128-76de-4835-a1df-d74fa0296b72,
  abstract     = {The GAIA astrometric mission has recently been approved as one of thenext two ``cornerstones'' of ESA's science programme, with a launch datetarget of not later than mid-2012. GAIA will provide positional andradial velocity measurements with the accuracies needed to produce astereoscopic and kinematic census of about one billion stars throughoutour Galaxy (and into the Local Group), amounting to about 1 percent ofthe Galactic stellar population. GAIA's main scientific goal is toclarify the origin and history of our Galaxy, from a quantitative censusof the stellar populations. It will advance questions such as when thestars in our Galaxy formed, when and how it was assembled, and itsdistribution of dark matter. The survey aims for completeness to V=20mag, with accuracies of about 10 mu as at 15 mag. Combined withastrophysical information for each star, provided by on-boardmulti-colour photometry and (limited) spectroscopy, these data will havethe precision necessary to quantify the early formation, and subsequentdynamical, chemical and star formation evolution of our Galaxy.Additional products include detection and orbital classification of tensof thousands of extra-Solar planetary systems, and a comprehensivesurvey of some 10&lt;SUP&gt;5&lt;/SUP&gt;-10&lt;SUP&gt;6&lt;/SUP&gt; minor bodies in our SolarSystem, through galaxies in the nearby Universe, to some 500 000 distantquasars. It will provide a number of stringent new tests of generalrelativity and cosmology. The complete satellite system was evaluated aspart of a detailed technology study, including a detailed payloaddesign, corresponding accuracy assesments, and results from a prototypedata reduction development.},
  author       = {Perryman, M. A. C. and de Boer, K. S. and Gilmore, G. and Høg, E. and Lattanzi, M. G. and Lindegren, Lennart and Luri, X. and Mignard, F. and Pace, O. and de Zeeuw, P. T.},
  issn         = {0004-6361},
  keyword      = {INSTRUMENTATION: MISCELLANEOUS,SPACE VEHICLES: INSTRUMENTS,ASTROMETRY,GALAXY: GENERAL,TECHNIQUES: PHOTOMETRIC,TECHNIQUES: RADIAL VELOCITIES},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {339--363},
  publisher    = {EDP Sciences},
  series       = {Astronomy & Astrophysics},
  title        = {GAIA: Composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361:20010085},
  volume       = {369},
  year         = {2001},
}