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Induction dose of propofol in patients using cannabis.

Flisberg, Per LU ; Paech, M J; Shah, T; Ledowski, T; Kurowski, I and Parsons, R (2009) In European Journal of Anaesthesiology 26(3). p.192-195
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: An estimated 150 million people worldwide use cannabis. The effect of cannabis on anaesthetic requirements in humans does not appear to have been studied. METHODS: In this prospective, randomized, single-blinded study, 30 male patients using cannabis more than once per week (group C) and 30 nonusers (group NC), aged 18-50 years, were induced with propofol 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 or 3.5 mg kg. Additional doses were given when required. The primary outcome was the 50% effective dose of propofol and successful induction was determined by loss of consciousness with a bispectral index value of less than 60 and satisfactory insertion of a laryngeal mask. Propofol requirements to achieve these outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: The... (More)
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: An estimated 150 million people worldwide use cannabis. The effect of cannabis on anaesthetic requirements in humans does not appear to have been studied. METHODS: In this prospective, randomized, single-blinded study, 30 male patients using cannabis more than once per week (group C) and 30 nonusers (group NC), aged 18-50 years, were induced with propofol 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 or 3.5 mg kg. Additional doses were given when required. The primary outcome was the 50% effective dose of propofol and successful induction was determined by loss of consciousness with a bispectral index value of less than 60 and satisfactory insertion of a laryngeal mask. Propofol requirements to achieve these outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: The dose required to achieve the target bispectral index value was not significantly higher in group C, but group C required a significantly higher propofol dose to achieve laryngeal mask insertion (314.0 +/- 109.3 vs. 263.2 +/- 69.5 mg, P < 0.04). The estimated effective propofol induction dose in 50-95% of patients did not significantly differ between groups. CONCLUSION: We conclude that cannabis use increases the propofol dose required for satisfactory clinical induction when inserting a laryngeal mask. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Anaesthesiology
volume
26
issue
3
pages
192 - 195
publisher
European Society of Anaesthesiology
external identifiers
  • wos:000264308600003
  • pmid:19237981
  • scopus:65349090681
ISSN
1365-2346
DOI
10.1097/EJA.0b013e328319be59
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ff92fd6b-28a0-45a3-8e96-9176ccb3669e (old id 1302258)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19237981?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-03-03 12:00:36
date last changed
2017-11-26 03:49:47
@article{ff92fd6b-28a0-45a3-8e96-9176ccb3669e,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: An estimated 150 million people worldwide use cannabis. The effect of cannabis on anaesthetic requirements in humans does not appear to have been studied. METHODS: In this prospective, randomized, single-blinded study, 30 male patients using cannabis more than once per week (group C) and 30 nonusers (group NC), aged 18-50 years, were induced with propofol 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 or 3.5 mg kg. Additional doses were given when required. The primary outcome was the 50% effective dose of propofol and successful induction was determined by loss of consciousness with a bispectral index value of less than 60 and satisfactory insertion of a laryngeal mask. Propofol requirements to achieve these outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: The dose required to achieve the target bispectral index value was not significantly higher in group C, but group C required a significantly higher propofol dose to achieve laryngeal mask insertion (314.0 +/- 109.3 vs. 263.2 +/- 69.5 mg, P &lt; 0.04). The estimated effective propofol induction dose in 50-95% of patients did not significantly differ between groups. CONCLUSION: We conclude that cannabis use increases the propofol dose required for satisfactory clinical induction when inserting a laryngeal mask.},
  author       = {Flisberg, Per and Paech, M J and Shah, T and Ledowski, T and Kurowski, I and Parsons, R},
  issn         = {1365-2346},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {192--195},
  publisher    = {European Society of Anaesthesiology},
  series       = {European Journal of Anaesthesiology},
  title        = {Induction dose of propofol in patients using cannabis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EJA.0b013e328319be59},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2009},
}