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Selective Removal of Photoreceptor Cells In Vivo Using the Biodegradable Elastomer Poly(Glycerol Sebacate)

Ghosh, Fredrik LU ; Neeley, William L; Arnér, Karin LU and Langer, Robert S (2009) In Tissue Engineering. Part A 17(13-14). p.1675-1682
Abstract
Retinal transplantation experiments have advanced considerably during recent years, but remaining diseased photoreceptor cells in the host retina physically obstruct the development of graft-host neuronal contacts which are required for vision. We here report selective removal of photoreceptors using the biodegradable elastomer poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS). A 1x3 mm PGS membrane was implanted in the subretinal space of normal rabbit eyes, and morphologic specimens were examined with hematoxylin and eosin staining and a panel of immunohistochemical markers. Seven days postoperatively, a patent separation of the neuroretina and retinal pigment epithelium was found as well as loss of several rows of photoreceptors in combination with massive... (More)
Retinal transplantation experiments have advanced considerably during recent years, but remaining diseased photoreceptor cells in the host retina physically obstruct the development of graft-host neuronal contacts which are required for vision. We here report selective removal of photoreceptors using the biodegradable elastomer poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS). A 1x3 mm PGS membrane was implanted in the subretinal space of normal rabbit eyes, and morphologic specimens were examined with hematoxylin and eosin staining and a panel of immunohistochemical markers. Seven days postoperatively, a patent separation of the neuroretina and retinal pigment epithelium was found as well as loss of several rows of photoreceptors in combination with massive TUNEL staining for apoptosis in the outer nuclear layer. After 28 days, the neuroretina was reattached, the PGS membrane had degraded, and photoreceptors were absent in the implantation area. Activated Müller cells were found in the entire retina in 7-day specimens, and in the implantation area after 28 days. AII amacrine and rod bipolar cell morphology was not affected, except for disrupted dendritic branching which was present in rod bipolar cells in 28-day specimens. We conclude that retinal detachment induced by the biodegradable PGS membrane creates a permissive environment in which graft-host neuronal connections may be facilitated in future retinal transplantation experiments. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Tissue Engineering. Part A
volume
17
issue
13-14
pages
1675 - 1682
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000292022300002
  • pmid:19191667
  • scopus:79959565862
ISSN
1937-335X
DOI
10.1089/ten.TEA.2008.0450
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d0c9fc97-ed8f-42a0-9232-2654eec112ec (old id 1302903)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19191667?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-03-04 16:45:06
date last changed
2017-08-27 03:37:49
@article{d0c9fc97-ed8f-42a0-9232-2654eec112ec,
  abstract     = {Retinal transplantation experiments have advanced considerably during recent years, but remaining diseased photoreceptor cells in the host retina physically obstruct the development of graft-host neuronal contacts which are required for vision. We here report selective removal of photoreceptors using the biodegradable elastomer poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS). A 1x3 mm PGS membrane was implanted in the subretinal space of normal rabbit eyes, and morphologic specimens were examined with hematoxylin and eosin staining and a panel of immunohistochemical markers. Seven days postoperatively, a patent separation of the neuroretina and retinal pigment epithelium was found as well as loss of several rows of photoreceptors in combination with massive TUNEL staining for apoptosis in the outer nuclear layer. After 28 days, the neuroretina was reattached, the PGS membrane had degraded, and photoreceptors were absent in the implantation area. Activated Müller cells were found in the entire retina in 7-day specimens, and in the implantation area after 28 days. AII amacrine and rod bipolar cell morphology was not affected, except for disrupted dendritic branching which was present in rod bipolar cells in 28-day specimens. We conclude that retinal detachment induced by the biodegradable PGS membrane creates a permissive environment in which graft-host neuronal connections may be facilitated in future retinal transplantation experiments.},
  author       = {Ghosh, Fredrik and Neeley, William L and Arnér, Karin and Langer, Robert S},
  issn         = {1937-335X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {13-14},
  pages        = {1675--1682},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Tissue Engineering. Part A},
  title        = {Selective Removal of Photoreceptor Cells In Vivo Using the Biodegradable Elastomer Poly(Glycerol Sebacate)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.TEA.2008.0450},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2009},
}