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Health-related quality of life and distress in cancer patients: results from a large randomised study

Johansson, B.; Brandberg, Y.; Hellbom, Maria LU ; Persson, C.; Petersson, L-M; Berglund, G. and Glimelius, B. (2008) 7th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology In British Journal of Cancer 99(12). p.1975-1983
Abstract
To compare the effectiveness of individual support, group rehabilitation and a combination of the two in improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and psychological well-being in cancer patients during 24 months after diagnosis, as compared with standard care (SC). Furthermore, to compare the study sample and a random sample of the Swedish population with regard to HRQOL. A total of 481 consecutive patients, newly diagnosed with cancer, were randomly assigned to one of the four alternatives. Data on HRQOL and psychological well-being were collected at baseline and after 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. The interventions did not improve HRQOL or psychological well-being, as compared with SC. At 3 months, the study sample reported an HRQOL... (More)
To compare the effectiveness of individual support, group rehabilitation and a combination of the two in improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and psychological well-being in cancer patients during 24 months after diagnosis, as compared with standard care (SC). Furthermore, to compare the study sample and a random sample of the Swedish population with regard to HRQOL. A total of 481 consecutive patients, newly diagnosed with cancer, were randomly assigned to one of the four alternatives. Data on HRQOL and psychological well-being were collected at baseline and after 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. The interventions did not improve HRQOL or psychological well-being, as compared with SC. At 3 months, the study sample reported an HRQOL comparable with the normal population. Many cancer patients are able to manage their cancer-related concerns with the support available from SC. However, it is reasonable to assume that the findings suffer from a lack of data from especially vulnerable patients and a possible Hawthorne effect. It cannot be concluded that cancer patients have no need for additional psychosocial interventions. Future projects should include screening and target interventions for those at risk for significant and prolonged psychological distress. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
psychosocial support, rehabilitation, group, health-related quality of life, distress
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
99
issue
12
pages
1975 - 1983
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
conference name
7th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology
external identifiers
  • wos:000261620100003
  • scopus:57449100232
ISSN
0007-0920
1532-1827
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6604789
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
efa13fbe-491e-4e48-824a-71eb9c0c6e43 (old id 1305717)
date added to LUP
2009-03-23 10:00:03
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:48:08
@inproceedings{efa13fbe-491e-4e48-824a-71eb9c0c6e43,
  abstract     = {To compare the effectiveness of individual support, group rehabilitation and a combination of the two in improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and psychological well-being in cancer patients during 24 months after diagnosis, as compared with standard care (SC). Furthermore, to compare the study sample and a random sample of the Swedish population with regard to HRQOL. A total of 481 consecutive patients, newly diagnosed with cancer, were randomly assigned to one of the four alternatives. Data on HRQOL and psychological well-being were collected at baseline and after 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. The interventions did not improve HRQOL or psychological well-being, as compared with SC. At 3 months, the study sample reported an HRQOL comparable with the normal population. Many cancer patients are able to manage their cancer-related concerns with the support available from SC. However, it is reasonable to assume that the findings suffer from a lack of data from especially vulnerable patients and a possible Hawthorne effect. It cannot be concluded that cancer patients have no need for additional psychosocial interventions. Future projects should include screening and target interventions for those at risk for significant and prolonged psychological distress.},
  author       = {Johansson, B. and Brandberg, Y. and Hellbom, Maria and Persson, C. and Petersson, L-M and Berglund, G. and Glimelius, B.},
  booktitle    = {British Journal of Cancer},
  issn         = {0007-0920},
  keyword      = {psychosocial support,rehabilitation,group,health-related quality of life,distress},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1975--1983},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  title        = {Health-related quality of life and distress in cancer patients: results from a large randomised study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604789},
  volume       = {99},
  year         = {2008},
}