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Carbon partitioning between oil and carbohydrates in developing oat (Avena sativa L.) seeds

Ekman, Asa; Hayden, Daniel M.; Dehesh, Katayoon; Bülow, Leif LU and Stymne, Sten (2008) In Journal of Experimental Botany 59(15). p.4247-4257
Abstract
Cereals accumulate starch in the endosperm as their major energy reserve in the grain. In most cereals the embryo, scutellum, and aleurone layer are high in oil, but these tissues constitute a very small part of the total seed weight. However, in oat (Avena sativa L.) most of the oil in kernels is deposited in the same endosperm cells that accumulate starch. Thus oat endosperm is a desirable model system to study the metabolic switches responsible for carbon partitioning between oil and starch synthesis. A prerequisite for such investigations is the development of an experimental system for oat that allows for metabolic flux analysis using stable and radioactive isotope labelling. An in vitro liquid culture system, developed for detached... (More)
Cereals accumulate starch in the endosperm as their major energy reserve in the grain. In most cereals the embryo, scutellum, and aleurone layer are high in oil, but these tissues constitute a very small part of the total seed weight. However, in oat (Avena sativa L.) most of the oil in kernels is deposited in the same endosperm cells that accumulate starch. Thus oat endosperm is a desirable model system to study the metabolic switches responsible for carbon partitioning between oil and starch synthesis. A prerequisite for such investigations is the development of an experimental system for oat that allows for metabolic flux analysis using stable and radioactive isotope labelling. An in vitro liquid culture system, developed for detached oat panicles and optimized to mimic kernel composition during different developmental stages in planta, is presented here. This system was subsequently used in analyses of carbon partitioning between lipids and carbohydrates by the administration of C-14-labelled sucrose to two cultivars having different amounts of kernel oil. The data presented in this study clearly show that a higher amount of oil in the high-oil cultivar compared with the medium-oil cultivar was due to a higher proportion of carbon partitioning into oil during seed filling, predominantly at the earlier stages of kernel development. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Experimental Botany
volume
59
issue
15
pages
4247 - 4257
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000261280000016
  • scopus:57149095061
ISSN
0022-0957
DOI
10.1093/jxb/ern266
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cad09dc1-b31d-49c5-b1fc-1e5aa767e201 (old id 1307533)
date added to LUP
2009-03-20 10:43:37
date last changed
2017-06-25 03:38:01
@article{cad09dc1-b31d-49c5-b1fc-1e5aa767e201,
  abstract     = {Cereals accumulate starch in the endosperm as their major energy reserve in the grain. In most cereals the embryo, scutellum, and aleurone layer are high in oil, but these tissues constitute a very small part of the total seed weight. However, in oat (Avena sativa L.) most of the oil in kernels is deposited in the same endosperm cells that accumulate starch. Thus oat endosperm is a desirable model system to study the metabolic switches responsible for carbon partitioning between oil and starch synthesis. A prerequisite for such investigations is the development of an experimental system for oat that allows for metabolic flux analysis using stable and radioactive isotope labelling. An in vitro liquid culture system, developed for detached oat panicles and optimized to mimic kernel composition during different developmental stages in planta, is presented here. This system was subsequently used in analyses of carbon partitioning between lipids and carbohydrates by the administration of C-14-labelled sucrose to two cultivars having different amounts of kernel oil. The data presented in this study clearly show that a higher amount of oil in the high-oil cultivar compared with the medium-oil cultivar was due to a higher proportion of carbon partitioning into oil during seed filling, predominantly at the earlier stages of kernel development.},
  author       = {Ekman, Asa and Hayden, Daniel M. and Dehesh, Katayoon and Bülow, Leif and Stymne, Sten},
  issn         = {0022-0957},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {15},
  pages        = {4247--4257},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Journal of Experimental Botany},
  title        = {Carbon partitioning between oil and carbohydrates in developing oat (Avena sativa L.) seeds},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ern266},
  volume       = {59},
  year         = {2008},
}