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Late Holocene effective precipitation variations in the maritime regions of south-west Scandinavia

de Jong, Rixt LU ; Hammarlund, Dan LU and Nesje, A. (2009) In Quaternary Science Reviews 28(1-2). p.54-64
Abstract
At present, the climate in south-west Scandinavia is predominantly controlled by westerlies carrying moist Atlantic air, which forms a main source of precipitation in all seasons. Past variations in the ratio between precipitation and evaporation (effective precipitation) from terrestrial sites, however, may indicate changes in the degree of maritime influence. Palaeoclimatic archives in this region are thus ideally situated to study past changes in atmospheric circulation patterns. In this study, multi-proxy comparisons of records from three peat bogs and two lakes are used to reconstruct regional-scale variations of effective precipitation in south-west Sweden during the Late Holocene. The total aeolian sediment influx into two peat bogs... (More)
At present, the climate in south-west Scandinavia is predominantly controlled by westerlies carrying moist Atlantic air, which forms a main source of precipitation in all seasons. Past variations in the ratio between precipitation and evaporation (effective precipitation) from terrestrial sites, however, may indicate changes in the degree of maritime influence. Palaeoclimatic archives in this region are thus ideally situated to study past changes in atmospheric circulation patterns. In this study, multi-proxy comparisons of records from three peat bogs and two lakes are used to reconstruct regional-scale variations of effective precipitation in south-west Sweden during the Late Holocene. The total aeolian sediment influx into two peat bogs is used as a proxy for storm activity. The frequency of storm phases increases strongly after ca 2500 cal yrs BP. Dry conditions occur on a regional scale around 4800-4400, 2000-1700, 1300-1000, 700-500 and 300-100 cal yrs BP. In addition, a comparison to winter precipitation reconstructed from four Norwegian glaciers shows similar variations during the past ca 2000 years. This indicates that the climate in both regions was controlled by large-scale atmospheric circulation dynamics of the North Atlantic region. The strong variability of effective precipitation and storm activity after ca 2500 cal yrs BP indicates a highly variable climate. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Quaternary Science Reviews
volume
28
issue
1-2
pages
54 - 64
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000262790800006
  • scopus:57749171754
ISSN
0277-3791
DOI
10.1016/j.quascirev.2008.09.014
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
797fd90c-51a4-44b6-9b2b-69e7991b5991 (old id 1311652)
date added to LUP
2009-03-17 09:15:38
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:24:51
@article{797fd90c-51a4-44b6-9b2b-69e7991b5991,
  abstract     = {At present, the climate in south-west Scandinavia is predominantly controlled by westerlies carrying moist Atlantic air, which forms a main source of precipitation in all seasons. Past variations in the ratio between precipitation and evaporation (effective precipitation) from terrestrial sites, however, may indicate changes in the degree of maritime influence. Palaeoclimatic archives in this region are thus ideally situated to study past changes in atmospheric circulation patterns. In this study, multi-proxy comparisons of records from three peat bogs and two lakes are used to reconstruct regional-scale variations of effective precipitation in south-west Sweden during the Late Holocene. The total aeolian sediment influx into two peat bogs is used as a proxy for storm activity. The frequency of storm phases increases strongly after ca 2500 cal yrs BP. Dry conditions occur on a regional scale around 4800-4400, 2000-1700, 1300-1000, 700-500 and 300-100 cal yrs BP. In addition, a comparison to winter precipitation reconstructed from four Norwegian glaciers shows similar variations during the past ca 2000 years. This indicates that the climate in both regions was controlled by large-scale atmospheric circulation dynamics of the North Atlantic region. The strong variability of effective precipitation and storm activity after ca 2500 cal yrs BP indicates a highly variable climate. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {de Jong, Rixt and Hammarlund, Dan and Nesje, A.},
  issn         = {0277-3791},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {54--64},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Quaternary Science Reviews},
  title        = {Late Holocene effective precipitation variations in the maritime regions of south-west Scandinavia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2008.09.014},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2009},
}